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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Austin,TX
    Posts
    2

    Smile

    Finally got into the field. I've tried before but didn't realize till now better to do it with EPA Certification.
    I've still got a few classes to get the certificate and plan on getting the Associates. So now that I'm in the field I think it should be much easier to learn. My last job was driving semi-trucks and just couldn't stomach the Houston,San Antonio, and Austin traffic no more. If anybodys thought of a career move to that field bad mistake. Current population of Texas is 18 million and they expect it to be 35 million in 30 years. Hence more traffic and accidents to come.
    Anywho just lookin for any advise or tips. It sounds like this company does a lot of commercial refrigeration. Grocery stores,restaurants,bars,convenience stores and such.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    892
    (1) Listen: The best attribute is the ability to listen and comprehend, whether it be the sound of a compressor or listening to the customer, or listening to someone that might teach you something. Never quit learning.
    (2) Test: It doesn't matter how sure you are that the breaker is off, put your voltmeter on it before you touch it. You can't see electrical potential.
    (3) Tools: Buy the best quality tools you can afford. Nothing is worse than buying a tool over and over again because it failed, when you could have spent the money on higher quality. And in the case of test instruments, buy the best possible, you can pay off the credit card later.
    (4) Realize that when you spend too much time trying to figure something out, the law of diminishing returns reduces you to a slobbering infant that can't read english. Stop, do something else, clear your mind, then come back.
    (5) Safety: Build safety into your routine to start out. Wearing safety glasses from day one is easier than wearing safety glasses 2 years into the trade. At the end of your career, you want to walk upright, count to ten with your fingers, have binocular vision, smell the flowers, and hear your grandchildren.
    I'm sure some others here will have some other answers, but otherwise good luck.
    - Rob

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,956

    Talking

    don't shine the drop light in the lead guys face when holding it...don't throw his tools(but he can throw yours)and what ever your do stay out of the BARS..offer to drive his truck if your on their coverage that is a big relief for a lead....good practice there for you....writing out the ticket with him dictating the job is cool also.changing parts....jump right in don't wait for him to ask.don't put your feet up on his dashboard the first day!if your with the same guy just realize he will treat you the way his lead did him back when so good luck on that draw.
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

  4. #4
    Hey Raven, we're neighbors. Let's have lunch some time.

    visit my website to get my number. Call me when ya get a question.
    I'm 30 minutes from you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Austin,TX
    Posts
    2
    Man talk about diving right in...Today was my first day on the job. I sure wish I had the residential air conditioning class under my belt. Looks like I'll be servicing all the equipment for a major grocery store. The guy showing me the ropes was pretty good. I've got a lot of reading to do on the controls. Oil failure control,demand cooling control,duel pressure control,low pressure control, high pressure control,fan cycle control,defrost clock....he threw all that at me plus some on my first day. I took some of your guys advice though...he tried finishing a contactor install from me and I took it back from him...So I probably scored a brownie point or 2 today. Man sure is hot on those roofs...they make a dewalt umbrella with a magnet attatchment??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rockhill South Carolina
    Posts
    370
    Have a notebook and pen in your pocket @ all times and when the guy who is teaching you explains something like how to pump down a rack write it down because you will be thrown to the wolves before you know it and you wont remember till you do it a few times.When you work with someone for a while you should be able to hand them the tool that they need before they even ask for it.And most importantly always hustle like Pete Rose!

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