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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31

    19DK High Oil Pressure

    Hello gents, my name is Jay and I'm 32 years in the trade and a journeyman fitter of Kansas City's Local 533. I know some of the other guys in our local post here when they get a problem, so I thought I'd give it a try. Just finished a complete overhaul on a 19DK that somehow got it's oil cooked . I never serviced this particular machine before, and no one is talking, so I just did the deal. New pinion and bull bearings, new high speed bearing/housing with new shoes and leveling pads, motor shaft to compressor labby, oil heater, oil thermostat, etc...

    As nasty as the machine was inside, I felt it a good idea to install Carrier's dual element remote oil filter assembly and a sight glass so the oil could be observed at a glance. Started the machine yesterday without incident, except the oil pressure was high (38 instead of the normal 28 to 30 I see on these). The machine sounded fine, and the high speed oil temp was within 1 degree of sump oil, and the oil flowing through the glass looked amazingly clean. Well, as most overhauled machines do, this one brought some oil back which I removed today. I had the feeling that maybe it just needs to be run some, but when I took an amp reading of the oil pump, it was 1.5, well over the FLA of .95. The heaters in the starter were hot but not hot enough to trip. Now I'm a bit worried about a potential blockage somewhere, even though the machine seems to run fine and all the oil return lines are nice and hot. The dual canister filter requires you to block shut the original relief in the oil pump and use an external relief valve. You also have to drill a hole through the original plunger for the bypassed oil to get back to the sump. Just curious as to what you guys might think. Any and all opinions or suggestions are very much appreciated. Thanks in advance, Jay

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31
    Oh, and FWIW, I only ran it for about 20 minutes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31
    Man, do I feel stupid now. When the instructions told me to drill a 3/16 hole through the old relief plunger, I drilled it through the side to match up with the charging valve hole. Apparently I was supposed to drill it lengthwise through the plunger. I did that, and oil pressure was a bit low, so now I'm silver soldering the first hole I drilled shut. I guess just because your an old guy doesn't mean you can't make stupid mistakes. And not to blame Carrier, as this is entirely my fault, but I've had better instructions with WalMart furniture than they supplied with this "kit". I also oredered a motor insulation "kit" as I had the stator dipped and baked. The sent me a big sheet of 5/8 Rubatex and a can of glue. Well, hopefully someone will see this and not make the same mistake that I did.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,020
    I don't think we ever outgrow the capacity to make kistakes. See? That spelling was a mistake, honest, I'm not clever enough to do that on purpose. I admire your courage to admit it to who knows how many people around the planet. And thanks for sharing, and the heads up on that "kit".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    I don't think we ever outgrow the capacity to make kistakes. See? That spelling was a mistake, honest, I'm not clever enough to do that on purpose. I admire your courage to admit it to who knows how many people around the planet. And thanks for sharing, and the heads up on that "kit".
    Well thank you for not rubbing it in. I've probably overhauled at least 10 of these rascals, but never had done the oil filter deal. Seems that they all had remote filters before I got to them. I think I can honestly say that I still learn something about this trade everyday. I started on Transport Refrigeration at 17 years old, did the grocery store routine for many years, then settled in on industrial HVAC. I hopefully only have 4 years left until retirement, and I bet I'll still be learning this trade. It's really changing these days, after many years of no real changes at all. I think it was the ozone scare that got the gears moving again. I remember having chillers, and even smaller Vilter recip. built up systems that you would add 100 or 200 pounds to every spring, it was no big deal. Nowadays if a purge pump cycles on the operator panics. Thank goodness for new sealants like loctite 515, and 554. I don't know if we could get these larger machines tight enough without them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,020
    I've got Trane CentraVacs under my belt. CVHE/F's, CVHA's, CVHB's, PCV's, and an old CTV or two. And I wasn't even lead rebuild tech in my old shop! Don't miss that at all, in my "semi-old" age. Until earlier today I would have agreed about the 515, but had lunch today with two old workmates from my old job. They are finishing second of two rebuilds on two CVHE's that were my account for 19 years, after I did factory startup. They've never been into, have pumpout rate of less than 1 minute per day. First stage vane tang arm never lubed, still had paint on insulation (applied at installation) undisturbed! I always suspected that recommended service for that tang arm was a mistake-think this proves it. And I think the decision to rebuild a chiller is best left to a case by case decision. My buddy told me he has never seen so little 515 on a chiller as he saw on these two! Showed me the discharge gasket, and there was no sign of any, all gaskets still soft, with some with hardly any flatness to them. I would still use it though. I've never seen a leak where we used it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31
    Now here's an odd twist; after the oil pressure issue was resolved, the oil pum motor amps stayed high. It is a 480v rated motor .95FLA, and .5HP. It started tripping the oil pump starter which is bad news on these machines as there is no real provision for coast down oil. The heaters were positioned in the Cutler Hammer starter to trip at .92, so I turned them over and upside down to the "D" position for a trip at 1.01. As the motor is drawing an even 1.4A on each leg, it tripped again but took much longer. The motor ohms out good, and the varnish megs out great. This leads me to believe there is a mechanical issue causing the high amperage. The pump was changed out before I came into the picture, but the motor is original. Oil PSID is 34 cold, and 28 hot. The amp draw never changes between cold or hot, or compressor running, or not running. It's 98 outside and they need this chiller. I'm considering a higher rated starter heater just to get them up and running. What say you guys?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,020
    You may want to start another thread with this new problem. People would have to wade thru some stuff (unfortunately, some of it mine) to get to your question.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    windy city
    Posts
    4,430
    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    You may want to start another thread with this new problem. People would have to wade thru some stuff (unfortunately, some of it mine) to get to your question.
    + mebbe moving over to the pro section.
    \m/
    original member of the racoon brotherhood

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    31
    Will do this evening, thanks.

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