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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    118
    Prior smaller company I worked for only had three service techs me being one and one of them used these seals kits all the time but did not follow the manufactures instructions of using the moisture eliminator product and taking out the driers etc. He just put it in every leaking system he came accross. He quit and next season a lot of compressor he had put that stuff into locked up and needed to be changed out.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Pensacola Florida
    Posts
    49
    Was not the safety relief on the bottom of the can it was the complete top of the can. Both bottles were sent to your company we received new ones. Both cans were installed by the step by step directions on the product. Personally watched the installation both times and the explosion both times. Installed properly by your directions.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by yunggun View Post
    Was not the safety relief on the bottom of the can it was the complete top of the can. Both bottles were sent to your company we received new ones. Both cans were installed by the step by step directions on the product. Personally watched the installation both times and the explosion both times. Installed properly by your directions.

    To begin with, we should first address the elephant in the room; the cans never exploded or experienced any deformation. (as shown in Figure 1)

    What is true however, both cans returned to us had lids that came off during the installation process. Both can lids were clearly not crimped on during the manufacturing process, as a result the lids easily pop off, with first contact of low pressure. There is an O-ring which seals the lid to the can, but without the crimping process it only takes a slight pressure over atmospheric to pop the top off. (as shown in Figure 2) This will explain why the lid came off, while the safety release valve (as shown in Figure 3) stayed intact, which only releases if the can is pressured beyond 420 psi.

    In 9 years of manufacturing our products, in vacuumed packed cans, we have only experienced 3 cans with this issue, it is unfortunate that 2 of the 3 were with your friend.
    We have documented the un-crimped can lids and reviewed with our quality control inspection in an effort to reduce even further, this rare occurrence.
    We place great importance on safety for our customer. For this reason our cans have a built-in safety relief valve which prevents the can from ever reaching dangerous conditions. In short the can will never explode.

    The technician who experienced the failure did confirm with us, that the cans did not explode. We thanked him for sending us the cans, and in return promptly provided him with replacement product.

    Best regards,
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  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by mikep View Post
    I delayed responding to your post to have a chemist friend review your product MSDS and your explanation of how the Superseal works. Based on the ingredients listed in your MSDS, the reaction with water does not and cannot initiate a polymerization reaction as you allege. Water reacts with your silicone compounds to release methanol and other alcohols. The only way your ingredients can be polymerized is with an acid and pre-polymerized silicone base. Your ingredients are classified as adhesion accelerators, and are used in silicone adhesives preparations that cure with acetic acid such as with RTV silicone's. The accelerators in your product are used in silicone adhesives because they are alcohol donors. The alcohols evaporate off with the acid to cure the RTV silicone base faster.
    My chemist friend does not have any faith in your science and I will spare you his off color comments. One thing he did mention was that he would not be concerned with combining water with your ingredients such as with a wet system. He would be more concerned with any acid in the system which would cause your ingredients solidify. This may explain why we are running into locked compressors and plug expansion devices.
    Here at Cliplight we want to take this time to give you a special thank you, added with congratulations! for putting in some hard fact digging to reveal the truth. Too many companies today are making all sorts of amazing claims without providing the true science.
    We are the original sealant company for the HVACR industry and as leaders in the chemical tool industry we actively offer science lectures here in North America and overseas speaking at training facilities and colleges. We do not limit our lecture material to just our chemical tools but open our research and development laboratory findings to all aspects of the HVACR service and repair industry. Our business motive is to grow new products by sharing our knowledge, opening it up to discussion and debate and responding intelligently and responsibly. Because of this ongoing dialogue over the past ten years with our customers we were able to develop our new Advanced refrigerant sealant product line.

    The answers we provided you are brief and if you would like more details we would invite you to call us in person.

    Customer - I delayed responding to your post to have a chemist friend review your
    product MSDS and your explanation of how the Superseal works. Based on the
    ingredients listed in your MSDS, the reaction with water does not and cannot
    initiate a polymerization reaction as you allege.

    Cliplight- MSDS only list those components that are hazardous which means that those deemed non hazardous are not mentioned. A simple experiment can be conducted to demonstrate that the sealant will polymerize when coming in contact with the grains of water present in the air. Using a clear piece of glass or a microscope slide, add a single drop of the the sealant composition to it and let it remain there for an hour. After an hour has passed by, wipe off the excess and you will see a clear film of sealant which has polymerized. This sealing action takes place at a much higher rate when it is carried with the oil and refrigerant as it exits the throat of the leak. This action triggers the dew point causing the air to drop out its moisture content accelerating the sealants ability to seal the leak.

    Customer- Water reacts with your silicone compounds to release methanol and other
    alcohols.

    Cliplight- Yes, but only the methoxy silanes produce methanol.

    Customer- The only way your ingredients can be polymerized is with an acid and
    pre-polymerized silicone base.

    Cliplight- Not entirely correct, acids will accelerate the rate of reaction but reaction can also occur when only in the presence of water. This can be easily demonstrated using the table experiment mentioned earlier.


    Customer- Your ingredients are classified as adhesion accelerators, and are used in
    silicone adhesives preparations that cure with acetic acid such as with RTV
    silicone's. The accelerators in your product are used in silicone adhesives
    because they are alcohol donors. The alcohols evaporate off with the acid to
    cure the RTV silicone base faster.

    Cliplight- Your correct, but that is a completely different area of technology.

    Customer- My chemist friend does not have any faith in your science and I will spare you his off color comments.

    Cliplight- In our case you do not require faith, we have over ten years of sealing systems world wide from automotive manufactures, medical industries, commercial and hospitality industries. You can check these out on our web site.

    Customer- One thing he did mention was that he would not be concerned with combining
    water with your ingredients such as with a wet system.

    Customer- He would be more concerned with any acid in the system which would cause
    your ingredients solidify.

    Cliplight- With or without our sealants, acids are a critical concern and should be removed from a system regardless. When we are only dealing with moisture, our sealants are equipped with a hydrolytic component to eliminate moisture which will help reduce acid formation while enabling the sealant to safely arrive at its intended destination and react to the moisture formed at the leak site instead of moisture internally present.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    Just picked up a job last night where The Super seal was installed with a new condensing unit 3 years ago.

    The compressor is roto-locked. No obvious indicators for failure.


    Client has been advised of the possible complications, but wants to replace the compressor.

    Any ideas about cleaning this crap out of the system?





    PS- Installing contractor appears to have gone out of business during the hottest summer I can remember

    Hello,

    Sorry for missing your question, in the future for a quick response, please call us directly @ 1-866-548-3644.
    When servicing a unit with our sealant we recommend using standard clean up practices. As you recover the refrigerant you also remove the sealant.

    Let's discuss the locked rotor:


    The compressor in your case was rotor locked and not a burnout. Just treat it like you would any other unit you would come across. Regardless of the sealant being used or not, the locked rotor could be an indication of low oil return due to partial blockage, improper sized piping or pipe runs and arrangement. It could also just be a premature mechanical failure due to bearing/ bushing wear. In any case it would be good work practice to open up the expansion devise and check for blockage.

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