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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,950
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliplight Mfg View Post

    The light used was a Blue 450nm wavelength light that was necessary to view the sealing process. This was to overcome the quality of the camera used, this had no affect on the polymerization of our sealant.
    I didn't have a problem seeing anything when the light was off
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Pensacola Florida
    Posts
    49
    I have personal seen 2 cans of clip light sealent explode. Following there instructions word for word. The tech it exploded on was just fine after getting checked at hospital. The company said they hadent had the problem before. But you will never see that crap in my hand. 2 cans 2 seperate occasions.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by yunggun View Post
    I have personal seen 2 cans of clip light sealent explode. Following there instructions word for word. The tech it exploded on was just fine after getting checked at hospital. The company said they hadent had the problem before. But you will never see that crap in my hand. 2 cans 2 seperate occasions.
    The can or the hose attachment?

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,392
    Just picked up a job last night where The Super seal was installed with a new condensing unit 3 years ago.

    The compressor is roto-locked. No obvious indicators for failure.


    Client has been advised of the possible complications, but wants to replace the compressor.

    Any ideas about cleaning this crap out of the system?





    PS- Installing contractor appears to have gone out of business during the hottest summer I can remember
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  5. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,950
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post

    Any ideas about cleaning this crap out of the system?
    Whats the problem? Don't they sell a can of clean the **** out too
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    41

    Confused

    Quote Originally Posted by itsiceman View Post
    Whats the problem? Don't they sell a can of clean the **** out too
    QFE
    Haven't had the pleasure. That's a tough one. Use the customer's reclaimer and vacuum pump

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Prospect, CT
    Posts
    1
    Has anyone used this product in a multi-V system (LG or Mitsubishi city multi)? Does/Could it gum up these systems?

  8. #34
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Central NJ Area
    Posts
    831
    I decided to try out leak freeze on an old unicorn system with a leaking evap coil. We will find out if it works. It just seemed a better choice since is doesn't react to moisture, air, and polymers. I'm not keen on using it but if its an old system that a custom7er just wants to squeeze a little more life out of it I'm willing to try it but i let them know the risks.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,157
    Quote Originally Posted by bjs619 View Post
    Has anyone used this product in a multi-V system (LG or Mitsubishi city multi)? Does/Could it gum up these systems?
    I wouldn't risk it. Those systems are full of cap tubes, strainers and LEVs. That could turn into disaster.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by mikep View Post
    According to your own explanation the sealant reacts with the condensate formed around the exit point of the refrigerant leak stream. This means a doughnut of sealant will form around the leak perimeter on the outside of the tubing not on the inside of the cavity as your video shows. Just exactly how does moisture get way down into the leak cavity when you have an opposing positive pressure refrigerant jet or stream. There is no way air or moisture can enter a leak unless the leak stops and starts sucking air.
    We can see the spray pattern of a refrigerant leak when we use dye so we should also see a spray pattern of sealant on surrounding surfaces but you do not talk about that. You also claim that the sealant bonds to metal coated with oil. Google cannot find an adhesive or sealant that can do that. When you jump in the shark tank prepare to lose a chunk of flesh.

    Thank you for your comments.

    At Cliplight we use science as a tool to expose myths and shed light on the truth. A shark tank is completely harmless for a diver with the proper equipment and knowledge. We fearlessly swim with sharks all the time and we are still here after 36 years. Are you sure that is our video or a competitor? I know some of our competitors use animation and show it the way you are describing.

    If that's the case, your analogy makes perfect sense.
    The only Cliplight sealant video that we have, is a magnified live experiment involving actual refrigerant, oil and a low pressure condition utilizing a measured engineered leak. If this is the one you are referring to, you are only witnessing the excess polymerization flowing out from the exit and spilling over the surface of the pipe. Behind this action the sealant is attaching itself to the interior of the throat (the conduit for the refrigerant leak) nearest to the exterior edge. When we study the point of leakage at the edge of the throats exit we see that moisture droplets are formed due to the effect of refrigerant expansion. Refrigerant exiting creates a throttling effect. The gas expands rapidly in atmospheric air, lowering the atmospheric dew point and letting go of its moisture content. Although this action produces droplets of water which are formed and quickly carried away with refrigerant the process is continually occurring allowing a wetted surface for the sealant to react to. Oil does not have time to collect at the edge as it is continually scrubbed away being miscible with the refrigerant. Once the oil leaves the throat with the expanding gas it will drop out of the flow path because of its heavier mass weight. The polymerization process continues building upon each other as it closes the exit area similar to a camera shutter. Along with this root action there is carryover of sealant which will form a raised mound similar to a volcano. When the process is complete you can actually sand the exterior and not disturb the seal. Once the micro leak has been repaired it can withstand up to a pressure of 850 psig +.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by eurocool View Post
    The MSDS for SUPERSEAL HVACR on their website lists "Incompatibilities & Conditions to Avoid: Reacts with water or moisture to form methanol."

    Ermmmm. So, it works by producing a condition that is to be avoided? Fishy fishy
    You’re exactly right with the analogy. Fish need water and so does our sealant. I like the way you think. We need more techs like you asking the hard questions so that manufactures will have to give account and prove that their products really do as they say they do. Thank you for the opportunity to discuss them.

    Background history:

    Methanol, ethanol and alcohol have been used for many years to prevent water in refrigeration systems from forming ice crystals at expansion devises. It works but unfortunately the drawback is that you still have water, water that may not freeze but will still react with oil and refrigerants and form acids.
    Bottom line is methanol is flammable along with the others and at Cliplight we like to put all the necessary details in our MSDS so that the handler (customer) can take all the precautions necessary to store, handle and apply the product safely. We put everything you need to know, complete disclosure to keep the customer safe.

    Here's the scenario. If you were to have a pallet of our product and a collision occurred during shipping where every can on the pallet split open and there was a source of ignition close by, you could potentially produce a flammable condition.
    Note: all Cliplight cans are vacuum packed and contain no propellants such as propane, isobutane or butane. The cans are steel walled and because they are in a vacuum the probability of the can rupturing on impact is very low compared to propane, isobutane or butane propellant cans.

    Our refrigerant sealants polymerize on contact with water. The ideal situation is to have the sealant contact with moisture in the air and not from the systems internal moisture. For that reason our new Advanced sealant has a hydrolytic chemical composition added to the sealant which can remove up to 60 drops of water from a single application regardless of the size of the unit. This addition helps to remove internal moisture conditions allowing the sealant to reach its target destination and react to the moisture being deposited at the leak site.

    My name is Paul Appler and I am the developer of this product. I would like to invite you to call me so we can discuss this in much greater detail then an email could ever possibly deliver.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Windsor, ON
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by yunggun View Post
    I have personal seen 2 cans of clip light sealent explode. Following there instructions word for word. The tech it exploded on was just fine after getting checked at hospital. The company said they hadent had the problem before. But you will never see that crap in my hand. 2 cans 2 seperate occasions.
    Could you please elaborate on this? Our cans have a safety relief on the bottom of the can, this will only open if pressurized over 420psi. This is a feature that is on all our sealant cans. Could this have been another product? Please Call 866-548-3644 and speak with Jesse Homenuik Research & Development Assistant so we can properly follow up on this situation.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    So.Cal
    Posts
    448
    I delayed responding to your post to have a chemist friend review your product MSDS and your explanation of how the Superseal works. Based on the ingredients listed in your MSDS, the reaction with water does not and cannot initiate a polymerization reaction as you allege. Water reacts with your silicone compounds to release methanol and other alcohols. The only way your ingredients can be polymerized is with an acid and pre-polymerized silicone base. Your ingredients are classified as adhesion accelerators, and are used in silicone adhesives preparations that cure with acetic acid such as with RTV silicone's. The accelerators in your product are used in silicone adhesives because they are alcohol donors. The alcohols evaporate off with the acid to cure the RTV silicone base faster.
    My chemist friend does not have any faith in your science and I will spare you his off color comments. One thing he did mention was that he would not be concerned with combining water with your ingredients such as with a wet system. He would be more concerned with any acid in the system which would cause your ingredients solidify. This may explain why we are running into locked compressors and plug expansion devices.

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