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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Central CA
    Posts
    567
    Jim is it possible to just buy the case and fittings if we already own the hoses and VCR's?

    Great video btw, maybe more guys will get interested in doing things the proper way.

    I just ordered my 1/2" hoses and the guys at the supply house thought i was crazy for it.

    I just installed a 410 system with 50' of 7/8-3/8" line set and pulled down to 250 in 10 minutes with a rise to 300 after 20 minutes using 3/8" hoses straight to the pump.
    Cant wait to see how it does with the 1/2" hoses

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    7,066
    Quote Originally Posted by stomper56 View Post
    Jim is it possible to just buy the case and fittings if we already own the hoses and VCR's?

    Great video btw, maybe more guys will get interested in doing things the proper way.

    I just ordered my 1/2" hoses and the guys at the supply house thought i was crazy for it.

    I just installed a 410 system with 50' of 7/8-3/8" line set and pulled down to 250 in 10 minutes with a rise to 300 after 20 minutes using 3/8" hoses straight to the pump.
    Cant wait to see how it does with the 1/2" hoses
    If you're already using multiple 3/8" hoses any time saved will be spent rasslin' the thicker 1/2" hose IMO
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,260
    Not to rain on the parade here, but even though it looks like a lot of cool toys, and it would be a nice set up to use on large systems.......

    Well it just looks like about 15 min of work hauling and setting up. Some of the stuff would be cool to have on the average job, but the rest seems like overkill to pump out a small unit like that. I do like the core tool and I use mine often, but not for pulling vacuum, I will try that next time. The micron gauge is nice as well. But those hoses look like a PIA to work with. However I have not had a chance to try them, so I can't say too much.
    JMO
    I r the king of the world!...or at least I get to stand on the roof and look down on the rest of yall

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Akron
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelbaron View Post
    Not to rain on the parade here, but even though it looks like a lot of cool toys, and it would be a nice set up to use on large systems.......

    Well it just looks like about 15 min of work hauling and setting up. Some of the stuff would be cool to have on the average job, but the rest seems like overkill to pump out a small unit like that. I do like the core tool and I use mine often, but not for pulling vacuum, I will try that next time. The micron gauge is nice as well. But those hoses look like a PIA to work with. However I have not had a chance to try them, so I can't say too much.
    JMO
    It is really not hard, nor does it take a long time. The video, beginning to end is 10 minutes, I really did not skip filming any of the steps. The hardest part was getting the core tools on the valves because of the close proximity of the service ports of that brand of unit. I assembled the kit to make it easy. The hoses are Appion hoses and are very flexible for 1/2" hoses. The 6' length makes the whole thing easy to set up and manage. The case makes it easy to gab everything in one neat package and carry it wherever you go.

    Believe me, it makes the job go so much faster that you would find yourself using the same tools if you had to service a window air conditioner.
    JLB,

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    Nicely done.

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Etters PA.
    Posts
    501
    Nice vid/setup. I just installed one of those units thursday,it was a dry swap out instead of a comp. I'm glad that's not my brand, pain in the but. Hopefully I will be ordering some of these tools soon,but I need to save up a few more pennies yet.

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tulsa
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by jim bergmann View Post
    thanks... here's my current setup with 3/8in hose and 10 CFM pump. thinking of switching to 1/2in hoses.
    normally use Blue Robinaire 6 CFM pump. that 10 CFM pump is too darn heavy to lug around.



    www.trutechtools.com/rapidevac

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    7,066
    Quote Originally Posted by jim bergmann View Post
    The hoses are Appion hoses and are very flexible for 1/2" hoses. The 6' length makes the whole thing easy to set up and manage.
    The 6' Appion 1/2" hoses are as flexible as the 5' 3/8" black yellowjackets I have but they are harder to manage in most situations because they weight twice as much. Plus the two 3/8 on my pump pulls the full 7 cfm through the 1/4" connections.
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida
    Posts
    1,620
    Nice job Jim. I use the Yellow jacket tree with 3/8 hoses and core tools. I use a 3rd core tool to protect my micron guage.
    Doug

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,745
    Some clarifying questions:

    1) Would it not be better, less leak chances, to have the hoses connect to the pump with a brass connection, like a tee or manifold(tree not not gauge)?


    2) you did release the nitrogen before attaching the had gauge, correct? I thought I heard something like "I do not want to expose the BluVac to these pressures".

    3) at the end you closed the CRT ball valves and released the liquid side service valve to put a positive pressure in the lines to keep air from getting in due to it being in a vacuum, correct? If yes, then do all the hose ends that are not low loss allow air in or were you just being extra cautious, why ruin all that work?
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
    from an excerpt by Paul Jacob in Sun City, AZ

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Palatine Il.
    Posts
    410
    Jim, I also would be interested in buying the bag, and parts bin with just the flare plugs and tee. I already have the hoses, CRT's (both 1/4 and 5/16) and a tree built into my pump.
    Hi, my name is Glenn, and I'm a Toolaholic!

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    56
    I pretty much have this setup and it is totally worth the investment! I have the appion crts and they rock, have the appion hoses 1/4" to 3/8", connect them to a yellow jacket vacuum tree and I'm all set up. Used it today, and immediately knew there was a leak, wouldn't pull down past 17000. Also have the blu-vac, totally worth it, you can watch exactly whats happening, that accurate. Helper brazed outside and left a leak on the ll side. Fixed the leak and immediately pulled down to about 170 microns and held about 250. Never been so sure about having a leak free system before I picked this up, so happy I did!

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Akron
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by pacnw View Post
    Some clarifying questions:

    1) Would it not be better, less leak chances, to have the hoses connect to the pump with a brass connection, like a tee or manifold(tree not not gauge)?


    2) you did release the nitrogen before attaching the had gauge, correct? I thought I heard something like "I do not want to expose the BluVac to these pressures".

    3) at the end you closed the CRT ball valves and released the liquid side service valve to put a positive pressure in the lines to keep air from getting in due to it being in a vacuum, correct? If yes, then do all the hose ends that are not low loss allow air in or were you just being extra cautious, why ruin all that work?
    1) We did use a tee, and it is better when you only have two points that need connected like in residential work. If this was for commercial, (over 10 tons) the Appion Megaflow kit would be a better pick. Typically on larger systems you can also connect at the receiver, discharge line, suction service port and possibly other places.

    2) I released the nitrogen down to about 1-2 psi so air and moisture could not work its way back into the system. When I cracked open the core tools I was making sure that I did not overload the pump. The reason I mentioned pressure is a lot of other vacuum gauges are not pressure rated. BluVac is, and it will not be contaminated if used properly.

    3) At the end, I cracked the suction service valve slowly to allow the refrigerant to pressurize the system before removing the vacuum gauge. No air can get into the system, only refrigerant can leak out at this point when making connections. Before you would charge the system, you would need to purge your manifold hoses. Many a system is contaminated by poor service practices.
    JLB,

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