Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Whitmore Lake, Michigan
    Posts
    14

    got hired and start on monday

    Just got hired and start Monday. Im currently in hvac trade school and this is my first hvac job. It is a smaller residential light commercial company.I am gonna be riding along with the owner/senior tech. And was wondering what to expect and be prepared for?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    40
    deer in the headlights. =P

    Keep everything neat in the truck and running for tools. Just watch what he's doing so later on in the week you can hand him tools before he sends you to get them.

    If you find yourself standing still for a long time offer to do something for him.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=1060461 i wrote that might help you out a little.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,244
    Use your brain. Think through everything you say before you say it. Ask yourself whether you can reason out the answer to your question before you ask it. You'll surprise yourself with how much you can figure out on your own, so you save your questions for more advanced stuff. A good boss will be happy to answer your questions, but he won't just hand you the answers. That won't get you on the path to becoming a good tech.

    Sometimes, it might be a good idea not to ask the questions but to do your homework after work, so you ask him for confirmation in the morning. Google is your friend and this site is VERY informative. Ask the boss for confirmation later if needed. That way you show that you're motivated and willing to learn.

    Don't talk to customers unless instructed to. I'm very new over here, I know nothing, ask the bossman. You have no idea how little it takes for them to freak out. Fortunately I've learned that one years before I got into this trade.

    Don't talk to the bossman if he's doing delicate work that requires concentration.
    Always clean up the jobsite.

    Have a pen and a block of paper handy. Start with a regular small block and when you go to a jobber, ask for one of theirs (as they usually have charts on'em).

    Pants with kneepad inserts are the tops - comfortable but they still protect your knees. Also make sure your boots are COMFORTABLE. I went to a large store with 40-50 different models that covered the ankle, tried on ALL OF THEM and then got the most comfortable ones for my foot. Also get those shoe inserts for hard floors. That'll make'em more comfortable than hikers in the bush.

    Your #1 priority is to get home alive and in one piece. Keep that in mind before you do anything. If you have any safety concerns, raise them with your boss.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,334
    You have two ears and one mouth for a reason - remember this. Don't attempt to dazzle him with all you've learned as you have only learned the bear minimum regardless of which school you attended. He knows you are still in school and know practically nothing - he certainly will not want to be schooled by you. If he's not one for small talk, you had better not be either.

    Do not be surprised nor say anything if he doesn't purge his hoses or ignores an EPA guideline here or there. He's probably been doing this long before all of that jazz. Just remain quiet if you feel he is doing something wrong and come back here and tell us about it. Unless he asks you to hold onto the business ends of a couple of live wires, of course.

    You have a possible advantage in that he is the owner and has a vested interest in showing you the ropes, milk the experience for all it is worth.

    Relax and know that this is the start of your real education - the school was just a formality.

    Good Luck! Let us know how it went.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    California/Nevada
    Posts
    3,627
    riding along with the owner is a good gig.

    * the most important thing is to get along with this guy.
    if he drops anything that sounds like an insult, let it fall off of you like water off a duck's back.

    * do not point things out, do not raise concerns, especially when the customer is around.

    show interst in the repairs,
    don't be a know-it-all, try not to talk about trade school unless asked about it

    HVAC is not just about doing repairs and collecting money, there are a lot of other important arts about customer relations

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,337
    For residential work, I would ask NO questions unless both of you are back in the truck. The boss will tell you otherwise if he likes.

    Silent helper is the best approach unless he indicates otherwise. Watch and learn.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    459
    Show a deep interest for the trade and learning it.

    Whenever he tells you something or explains something listen very closely and attentively.

    Be enthusiastic about whatever you do throughout the day and show initiative when doing it.

    To me these things go a long long way. The more I can tell someone is interested in the trade, the more I'm willing to share and show.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    GEORGIA
    Posts
    1,532
    Please put things back, exactly where they came from...to each his own...I am really annal about this...

    I can glance at the back of my van and tell what is missing...this is 10 fold when it comes to my Veto LC....

    If I lose ANYTHING it is the helpers fault....

    Have you ever been locked under a house?
    Are you afraid of the dark?

    I think you will do fine, you asked a good question....

    GOOD LUCK and welcome......

    "Value our Differences"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,244
    That brings us back to a big one that's obvious to people who have been around but isn't obvious to some young guys new to the trades.. If you don't have a tool that you need to finish the job with, ask the bossman every time you need to touch it and when you're done with it, clean it up and put it back exactly where you found it. In trade school, I came across a kid who didn't know better. When I asked for my tubing cutter back, he said "wait a minute, I'm not done with it yet." What came out of my mouth wouldn't be appropriate to repeat on a public forum.

    If you find yourself borrowing the tool frequently, unless it's a big ticket item like reclaimer or flue gas analyzer, buy your own.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    4,381
    Put your phone on vibrate & don't take it out while he's around. If he asks you for an adjustable make sure to ask him whether he wants metric or standard

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago area
    Posts
    1,439
    I've had many apprentices over the years, and here is what I cant stand.

    1-
    Talking on the cell phone, for more then a few seconds. If some one calls, and it is not an emergency, tell them you are at work and will call them either between calls, at lunch, or after work.

    2-
    Complaning about how hot, or cold it is. Yeah, I get it. It's hot on the roof, I'm here too.

    3-
    Being late to work is my biggest. If you cant be 15 minutes early, there is the door, and a 100 others waiting for the opportunity that you just got. If you are gonna be late, call as soon as you know you will be, and know when you expect to get in.

    4-
    Don't make plans for after work too early. If a call runs late, deal with it, and don't complain, its all part of the job.

    5-
    Don't ask to smoke it the truck, if he's not a smoker.

    A few things to do:

    1-
    wear pants and tuck in your shirt. Even if your boss is a slob, you dont need to be.

    2-
    Pack a lunch. I know plenty of guys who don't stop for lunch.

    3-
    Ask questions.

    4-
    Carry his tools, and dont complain about how heavy they are, I assure you he knows.

    5-
    If you become responsible for maintaining the truck, don't throw anything away unless you know its garbage.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    Follow the advice given above and ill add a couple more...


    1) Stay off the phone! (seeing a pattern to this one?)

    2) If asked to do something and you don't understand or don't know how, ask!

    3) Bring lots of water.

    4) In the truck between jobs, write down what the problem was, how it was diagnosed and what the boss did to fix it.

    If your mechanically inclined and like working with your hands, the you are about to embark on a rewarding career. Best of luck to you!

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    GTA, ON
    Posts
    1,244
    Quote Originally Posted by dsprice View Post
    1) Stay off the phone! (seeing a pattern to this one?)
    One of my first times out was with a tech who just joined the company (had a couple of years under his belt at another place). His wife called..

    Wife: Hey, how's it going?
    Tech: Is anybody dead or in the hospital?
    Wife: What?
    Tech: Is anybody dead or in the hospital?
    Wife: No... Just wanted to see how you're doing
    Tech: Don't call me at work unless someone's dying or in the hospital [CLICK]

    She held out on him for a week, but you can bet your sweet *** she never bothered him at work unless it was a real emergency and she got over it.

    That incident motivated me to have a less adversarial, preemptive conversation with my wife

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event