Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    10

    Hmm

    My Sporlan TXV valve was installed in 1987 in my 3-4 ton Lennox Central Air Conditioner. The valve top is red-ornage colored and has the number "88" on its top. The bottom where the valve is usually adjusted is attached to the evaporator coil intake. Anyone ever seen an installation like this? Seems odd!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    It is a second generation TEV with internal check valve. You should find a "Y997-BIVE" metal stamped on the side of the valve along with its nominal capacity. The bottom of the valve is connected to the valve's inlet fitting via a 1/4" OD tube. The bottom of the valve is where the internal check is located. The "88" doesn't make sense though. The valve uses a "43" element size.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    10

    TXV Valve

    Nope, no other numbers on the valve. According to my instructions for my new TXV valve, the "88" would be the Element number. I don't see any valves in my books that are installed from the bottom cap assembly to the coil intake evaopartor. This TXV valve has two other ports: a 3/8 in port (liquid line into valve) and a 1/4 out that is attached to the evaporator out line like an external equalizer line. The "hat" of the TXV valve is installed in a vertical position. The bulb is also installed on the evaporator outlet coil pipe vertical instead of horizontally so I tend to think the installer didn't understand the valve. This would explain the inefficiency of my system, i.e., a TXV valve installed wrong.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    Trust me, Sporlan doesn’t make an "88" element. It could be part of a date code (1988) though.

    If this valve has a 1/4" OD tube connecting the bottom of the valve to the inlet of the valve, I'm certain it is a Type Y997 TEV with internal check. Sporlan metal stamps all of their TEVs. Look at all of the hex flats on the TEV body.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    10

    Reply

    There are three connections (not ports). One is NOT a 1/4 connected to the inlet. A 3/8 port on the TXV is connected to the liquid line. A 1/4 port on the TXV is connected to the EVAPORATOR COILL OUT PIPE as a feed-back. The BOTTOM of the TXV is connected( I think incorrectly) to the inlet of the evaporator coil. It is 3/4". It looks like someone connected the bottom when they should have left it open with a cover screw cap for adjustments. The Freon, however, does appear to flow and vaporize and an excessive cost. Doesn't make sense!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987

    Re: Reply

    Originally posted by smithone
    There are three connections (not ports). One is NOT a 1/4 connected to the inlet. A 3/8 port on the TXV is connected to the liquid line. A 1/4 port on the TXV is connected to the EVAPORATOR COILL OUT PIPE as a feed-back. The BOTTOM of the TXV is connected( I think incorrectly) to the inlet of the evaporator coil. It is 3/4". It looks like someone connected the bottom when they should have left it open with a cover screw cap for adjustments. The Freon, however, does appear to flow and vaporize and an excessive cost. Doesn't make sense!
    First of all, very few residential a/c units have adjustable TEVs. Your EVAPORATOR COIL OUT PIPE is called an equalizer line. Almost every residential a/c TEV has one. Don't be concerned about it. It's clear to me you don't understand how a TEV works, and you need a qualified service technician to look at this unit.

    The only question I have for you at the moment is this connection from the bottom of the TEV to the inlet connection. The line cannot be 3/4" OD. The inlet fitting isn't large enough.

    If this valve is a Sporlan TEV, you can simplify things by simply reading the metal stamping on the side of the valve.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    10

    Wink Misunderstanding

    My question is still not answered. Again, there are no markings on the Sporalan TXV/TEV valve! My TEV/TXV has its bottom attached to the in port (3/4 inch) of my evaporator coil. The liquid line is 3/8. Again, the TEV/TXV has an External Equalizer Connection that feeds back pressure from the evaporator coil output. This provides feedback pressure on the underside of the TXV diaphragm...augmenting the spring force opposing the bulb pressure. You have never seen a TXV attached like this and this is the problem I am trying to research but don't dismiss the idea, no one else has heard of this either! This has nothing to do with anyone's understanding of a simple TXV valve and this assumption should not have entered into your answer. The fact that the bulb is installed vertically should have given you a clue that the tech who installed the valve did not understand it.
    The bottom of the TXV IS 3/4 and it IS attached to the evaporator coil input. Have you ever seen a TXV/TEV attached like this through it's bottom to the evaporator coil? What would be the point of installing a Sporlan TXV valve if it cannot be adjusted? Why not just install a fixed capillary tube? If you don't understand, don't send me to the Wizard Of Oz, just say you don't understand why the valve is attached on the bottom, ask for clarification, or let the question go! Mayby someone else on line understands the question and can answer it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    4,414

    Re: Misunderstanding

    Originally posted by smithone
    The fact that the bulb is installed vertically should have given you a clue that the tech who installed the valve did not understand it.
    Even so it is not the preferred method, the bulb can be installed vertically.

    Originally posted by smithone
    What would be the point of installing a Sporlan TXV valve if it cannot be adjusted? Why not just install a fixed capillary tube?
    A fixed capillary tube does not adjust the amount of refrigerant it meters into the evaporator as does the TXV with the measuring of the temperature with the bulb. The correctly sized TXV will be chosen for the size of the evaporator and doesn't need to be adjusted.

    Originally posted by smithone
    If you don't understand, don't send me to the Wizard Of Oz, just say you don't understand why the valve is attached on the bottom, ask for clarification, or let the question go! Mayby someone else on line understands the question and can answer it!
    Please do not insult others

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Dimas, CA
    Posts
    10

    Insulting Statements

    Please, no more insulting emotional responses. If you choose to answer a question try not to make statements as you did, personally attacking the person who asked the question's knowledge. Again, you failed to answer the question!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    783
    No one is trying to insult you or anyone else. The answer is simple. I have seen thousands of Sporlan valves in my life and never one like you have. Could be it was a special made valve for the machine you are operating on. NO problem. Just install the new valve the way it is supposed to be installed. Get out the good old torch and some fittings and make it work. That is what everyone else does.
    Good luck with your endevor.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,189

    Re: Insulting Statements

    Originally posted by smithone
    Please, no more insulting emotional responses. If you choose to answer a question try not to make statements as you did, personally attacking the person who asked the question's knowledge. Again, you failed to answer the question!
    There's not been a personal attack, but an observation by a member that knows TEV operation and construction. Mr. Schoen is a design engineer for a TEV manufacturer, and I do believe that it's Sporlan. Google will reveal the answer for you.

    Thread closed. No DIY per the site rules.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event