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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1
    We have a new Goodman furnace,an older Fedders central air unit, and a Honeywell thermostat. Our air conditioning unit--both compressor and fan will not stop running once the thermostat reaches the desired temperature. We usually keep the t'stat set on 72. The fan is set to Auto. This morning when I got up the room temperature was 62. The unit had run nonstop all night. The only way we can get the unit to stop is to turn the switch to Off on the t'stat. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    70
    something is wrong with your thermostat, wires, circuit board, or contactor
    you should call a service tech

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    516
    Is it a round honeywell?
    Common problem, have the stat replaced.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    126
    100% agreed have stat replaced

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    California
    Posts
    634
    wanna buy a t-stat LOL

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    2,137
    I doubt it's a wire short if it stops when you switch it to off. Sounds like you need a new thermostat. I wouldn't do it yourself, have your contractor come out and swap it, and test everything at the same time to make sure nothing else is bad.
    Good? Bad? I'm the guy with the gun.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,903
    If you don't have a heatpump or anything which requires more than four wires, replacing a t-stat can be a DIY task. (I know I’ll get flamed for this)

    I'm not going to post any DIY instructions of obvious reasons, but whatever you do, turn the power off first to avoid shorting anything out.

    It's your choice; many members here go overboard and think that a homeowner shouldn't even change a filter if it happens to be in the blower compartment.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    82
    amd is right but you still may want to call a service tech out just to make sure ther is'nt any other problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Orange County, NY
    Posts
    936
    Originally posted by bgrich2003
    something is wrong with your thermostat, wires, circuit board, or contactor
    you should call a service tech

    This is the most intelligent answer and best advice here. I suggest you follow it.

    Core

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    I recently changed out my thermostat. Simple 4-wire project. All electic AC/Heat. But, I knew beyond doubt that my problem was the thermostat. Had I not known that, I would have called my HVAC company.

    good luck,
    jdb

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Originally posted by amd


    It's your choice; many members here go overboard and think that a homeowner shouldn't even change a filter if it happens to be in the blower compartment.
    Many members here think of homeowners safety first, which is why I wouldn't advise changing a filter in a compartment that contains line voltage.Alot of homeowners don't have a clue as to what can hurt them. Remember this.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Originally posted by jdb52
    I recently changed out my thermostat. Simple 4-wire project. All electic AC/Heat. But, I knew beyond doubt that my problem was the thermostat. Had I not known that, I would have called my HVAC company.

    good luck,
    jdb

    Here's a classic example. JDB was successful. That's good. What if that t-stat was a old line voltage one, and homeowner doesn't know the difference. Homeowner badly hurt/dead, great internet advise to blame.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    Smokin 68,

    You wrote:
    Here's a classic example. JDB was successful. That's good. What if that t-stat was a old line voltage one, and homeowner doesn't know the difference. Homeowner badly hurt/dead, great internet advise to blame.


    I understand the resistance to DIY information on this site. When I changed my stat, I researched it and got advice from another site, and frankly, I was surprised that such information and willingness to help was available given understandable liability concerns. But, the final responsibility for these kinds of decisions are with us, homeowners. If something bad happens, we are to blame, not you or any internet advice. I know that not everyone would see it that way.

    If I was in your shoes, I wouldn't give DIY advice either.


    jdb

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