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  1. #1

    Compressor problem.

    I tried to find my answer already by reading some old posts, but didn't see any posts like my problem so here goes.
    I have a Rheem Zypher(sp) cond unit that is giving me problems when the temp outside gets above 90 or so. It seems that when the temp outside gets above 90 my compressor will sometimes overheat and the overload will keep it from starting again when the unit cycles. I can pull the disconnect and cool the compressor off with water and it will start and run fine for several hrs and sometimes it will do the same thing again after the temp inside is satified and the unit cycles. I checked the charge and it looks good to me, 65ish low and 245ish on the high side. The panel label recommends a high side of 244 at 95 degrees outside temp. I have cleaned the coils and still have the same problems, I haven't checked amps on the compressor but I can get an amp probe if needed to do this. I really don't want to replace the cond if I don't have to, just buried my mom in law so I'm short on funds right now.
    The unit was installed in 98 when house was built.
    Also my wife requires the house to be cold due to her MS issues, and if I let the inside air temp get up to 75, then crank the unit down to 70 so it will run through the "heat of the day", 4 or 5 hrs, it will run the whole time with no issues. It also runs all evening and night without issue.

    Kinda confussed on this one, any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    435
    If the compressor is tripping the internal overload when trying to start, it has starting problems. When your A/C guy comes out, have him check for proper voltage, the contactor contacts and the run capacitor. Then, have him go over the system to ensure everything else is in order (subcooling if it has an expansion valve, superheat if it has an orifice, etc.).
    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    BillDuffy

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
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    Quote Originally Posted by readtrio View Post
    I have a Rheem Zypher(sp) cond unit that is giving me problems when the temp outside gets above 90 or so.
    It seems that when the temp outside gets above 90 my compressor will sometimes overheat and the overload will keep it from starting again when the unit cycles.
    I can pull the disconnect and cool the compressor off with water and it will start and run fine for several hrs and sometimes it will do the same thing again after the temp inside is satisfied and the unit cycles.
    I checked the charge and it looks good to me, 65ish low and 245ish on the high side. The panel label recommends a high side of 244 at 95 degrees outside temp.
    I have cleaned the coils and still have the same problems, I haven't checked amps on the compressor but I can get an amp probe if needed to do this. I really don't want to replace the condenser if I don't have to, just buried my mom in law so I'm short on funds right now.
    The unit was installed in 98 when house was built.
    Also my wife requires the house to be cold due to her MS issues, and if I let the inside air temp get up to 75, then crank the unit down to 70 so it will run through the "heat of the day", 4 or 5 hrs, it will run the whole time with no issues. It also runs all evening and night without issue.

    Kinda confused on this one, any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
    The amp draw of the compressor could be normal with the situation described as it is primarily a temperature overheating problem; would be helpful to know though.

    There are a number of causes for which we have no troubleshooting test data to use.

    It appears to be a situation where the evaporator is being heat overloaded or, the metering device is NOT supplying enough liquid refrigerant to the coil.

    Either case would result in a possible too high a suction temperature superheat resulting in the compressor overheating.

    Also, there are various conditions which will result in the compressor pumping its oil into the refrigerant lines where it is not returning properly thus, causing too much mechanical friction; normally this would also result in hard starting issues, which it doesn't appear to have.

    Does it have a hard start kit on it? TXV or piston orifice metering device?

    You need to have a Tech check both superheat & subcooling temps & examine the metering device for improper functioning.

    Could also be a partial restriction in the refrigerant system.

    Should be a rather easy diagnosis...What is the indoor temp-split between supply air & return air & the percent humidity; out door condenser temp rise off it compared to outdoor temp? Do you have other ways to check airflow CFM? If E-Coil is clean, Indoor temp-split in relation to percent humidity may be one indicator of airflow CFM across the coil.
    Last edited by udarrell; 06-03-2012 at 01:41 PM. Reason: punctuation...

  5. #5
    The evap has a TXV. Sounds over my head for sure. I need someone to check it thoroughly, any suggestions on a tech/company south of Ft.Worth Texas?

    Quote Originally Posted by udarrell View Post
    The amp draw of the compressor could be normal with the situation described as it is primarily a temperature overheating problem; would be helpful to know though.

    There are a number of causes for which we have no troubleshooting test data to use.

    It appears to be a situation where the evaporator is being heat overloaded or, the metering device is NOT supplying enough liquid refrigerant to the coil.

    Either case would result in a possible too high a suction temperature superheat resulting in the compressor overheating.

    Also, there are various conditions which will result in the compressor pumping its oil into the refrigerant lines where it is not returning properly thus, causing too much mechanical friction; normally this would also result in hard starting issues, which it doesn't appear to have.

    Does it have a hard start kit on it? TXV or piston orifice metering device?

    You need to have a Tech check both superheat & subcooling temps & examine the metering device for improper functioning.

    Could also be a partial restriction in the refrigerant system.

    Should be a rather easy diagnosis...What is the indoor temp-split between supply air & return air & the percent humidity; out door condenser temp rise off it compared to outdoor temp? Do you have other ways to check airflow CFM? If E-Coil is clean, Indoor temp-split in relation to percent humidity may be one indicator of airflow CFM across the coil.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    NE Alabama
    Posts
    301
    Try the Contractor Map.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    435
    Quote Originally Posted by readtrio View Post
    It seems that when the temp outside gets above 90 my compressor will sometimes overheat and the overload will keep it from starting again when the unit cycles.
    The compressor has starting issues.
    With your chrome heart shining in the sun, long may you run.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,894
    Originally Posted by readtrio View Post
    It seems that when the temp outside gets above 90 my compressor will sometimes overheat and the overload will keep it from starting again when the unit cycles.
    Quote Originally Posted by SandShark View Post
    The compressor has starting issues.
    When the compressor gets too hot the temperature sensor opens & will stay open for a rather long time because there is no cold suction vapor to cool it.

    When he ran cold water over the compressor it cooled down enough for the open thermal disconnect to close & the compressor started up; therefore it is an overheating problem.

    A compressor should not be run in those conditions as the excess heat will break down the motor winding insulation & the compressor oil, leading to a compressor locking-up or worse, shorting out & contaminating the entire system.

    On compressors that won't start, the condition of the oil should always be checked for ACID using an acid kit.

    The cause of the compressor overheating must be found & eliminated ASAP.

    This ought to be a relative easy diagnosis & fix...

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