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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,186
    A load calculation is best IF you don't fudge input numbers to get the answer you want. Newer homes in our area can be as little as 1,000 sqft per ton, 800sq ft per ton is common. Older homes and upstairs units can go as high as 350sq ft per ton. Unfortunately "rule of thumb" 500sq ft per ton is what typically gets installed regardless of actual load...

    On the heat side pick the smallest capacity furnace that has the blower size you need for A/C, it's more than enough heat for just about any southern home.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    King of Prussia, PA
    Posts
    13
    What kinda of load calc software are you guys using?

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,880
    rhvac.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    318

    Hmm

    My 2000 sq ft house has a cooling load of 1.5 tons - you are not going to get a return call if you ROT a 3.5 to 4 ton price at me. Just sayin.....

    I get the whole "quote over the phone" thing for people who are just price shopping but on a sales call - a quick load calc is not that hard to do. You can adjust from there if you get the job. My experience is there are quite a few contractors out there that will ballpark something and install inappropriate size equipment. The way homes and equipment are being built today, it is harder to just make a guess at what you need. As an aside, we do have the luxury in Indiana of not having a statewide heating and cooling contractor licensing requirement. What fun when you get into rural areas.

    The other thing we should be doing as contractors is evaluating the structure and making recommendations on energy efficiency improvements so we can make the equipment smaller. Better for everyone.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by zxcb View Post
    What do you guys use for a wall R factor in old houses when the HO has no idea what insulation is in the walls?
    Anyone?

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,880
    R9 to R11 depending on stud center and siding.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    15
    Most will figure 500 sq ft per ton, but also U will need to consider lots of factors. Cause I have been many homes with lots of windows and very high ceilings and that figure want work. Also some units that are too tight with today's technology of foam insulation will cause problems for size of units. Just my thought on the subject. Good luck

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    bedford ind
    Posts
    1,088
    Where's bunny?

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    R9 to R11 depending on stud center and siding.
    Thank you

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt_M View Post
    What kinda of load calc software are you guys using?
    Wrightsoft for residential
    Trane Trace 700 for commercial

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