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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,617
    The 4 " x 4" dual display thermometer with outdoor probe gets fairly close functionally.

    The unit is on 24/7 and the only buttons are min/max and reset. The C/F is changed with a dip switch on the back.

    Calibration isn't dead on and unit to unit variation can be considerable for those mass produced consumer units, but the basics are there. Large dual display. It just needs a tighter calibration tolerance and optimized response characteristics.

    The one function that would be nice on the front button would be "averaging period". This is different from sampling rate. The display basically refreshes continuously, but instead of reading what the probe reports back, it would report temperatures that is averaged over a span of (xx seconds, as set by the buttons).

    Just because a product is tailored for HVAC doesn't mean the core is better. The CPS 220 scale is a good example. It sucks worse than my postage scale.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,691
    "The concept is for a dual temperature thermometer that is easy to carry, setup, read and store. No buttons to push to change the display, a magnet on the back for quick mounting, and a way to store the right kind of probes for taking accurate air temperature readings without them getting damaged.
    Oh, hey, lets get a little crazy too. we'll add a central display that tells us the DeltaT too!"

    how does this differ from Fieldpiece STA2?

    probes are interchangeable for DB or WB, there is either Delta T or individual temp display, magnet on carry case and probes CAN be stored in the case.

    Yes, you do have to push a button to switch between readouts, but come on.

    As for the 605 H2, they do WB, DB and %RH. Some simple math for Delt T.
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
    from an excerpt by Paul Jacob in Sun City, AZ

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    475
    Also, for what it's worth, two simultaneous dry bulb air stream measurements are the least of the measurements I need to take. Almost an afterthought in cooling season, and a spec. check in heating.

    I have another ten grand in tools to tell me if things are working right.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,219
    Quote Originally Posted by AccurateHT View Post
    Haha! Sorry man, for my part I assumed you wanted wet bulb.

    A patent attorney would want to know, what is the unique feature of your idea? That might help us understand the difference between this and a 52II, etc.

    Is it the on board probe storage? You said you wanted no buttons. To me that says no features, I like features, even if I don't use them a lot.
    no sweat.

    The guy I was responding to was pointing to a manometer.... I was like... huh???

    I don't know about the whole legal end of it even though I get what you are saying. It's supposed to be a (mostly)dedicated purpose tool that's quick to set up. accurately measures because it's well into the air stream and doesn't flop around inside the duct like a typical K-type. doesn't keep my hands busy because of the magnets and the rigid probe. Is protected from damage in the tool bag because YES, the probes fit inside the body of the meter. Lets not forget that it's compact and it all goes together when you're done so no more "where did my K-type go?? BS

    The only part that I don't have 100% in my head is how the probe leads get stored so they don't make a mess, but I have ideas there too.

    BTW, I like fluke, and nothing against the 52II, but three bills seems nuts for taking temps in a way that isn't streamlined to the way we do it. The quicker I can do something, the more likely it is to actually get done.

    I've got a crapload of tools, and there are times I have to make a choice about what I'm going to carry into that house, and that effects how well I do my job. I like fancy. I also like quick, easy and durable too!!
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,617
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    Thanks again. I think either atleast some people aren't getting how much easier my "temperature brick" would be to carry and use, or maybe they just don't care.
    I don't necessarily believe in reinventing the wheel, but I agree with you. User interface and ergonomics are everything in things that involve repetitive use.

    having features are important, but those that get in the way are more harmful.

    Suppose you use function A and C often... but the instrument as A through E and the only way to toggle between is sequentially from A through E...

    A.. push push.. you're now in C.
    push, push, push. you're now in A.
    btw you turned the power off... so it restarts at A.

    The infrequently used functions should be there, but they need to be tucked away in a manner that doesn't get in the way of using the features you most frequent.

    Car stereos and appliances are like this. While the features look great on sales floor, I only have a few seconds to make the changes I need at the stop light if I have to look. If it's something not as complicated, I value the ability to make the adjustments without looking so I can pay attention to the road.

    Factory stereos used to be very well designed. Aftermarket ones with tiny buttons not so much. These days, if you rent a fully loaded car, it takes 3 minutes to figure out how to work the stupid stereo since you have to dive so far into the menu to perform the basic functions.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    475
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    I also like quick, easy and durable too!!
    This is what Testo needs to hear, and one of the reasons Fluke is worth the extra money.

    My first years in the field I made $8 an hour. I bought a $15 pocket DMM from Radio Shack and that little thing took a beating (including getting soaked, then a dashboard revival) years later, I finally was embarrassed into getting a real one. My point being, durability doesn't cost much to build, but absent, it can cost us a days work and cost a manufacturer a customer for life.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,653
    In response to the OP in general I think this is the easiest way to get what you want.
    If a idea is good someone will start making it.

    Yours looks like it will fit good in a pocket or tool bag and stay all together which is the best part IMO. Wish more tools were like this.

    I don't think magnets and K-type sensors together are a good choice though. A magnet screws with the reading of the TC and wouldn't work on duct board either
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,068
    One improvement to that idea, you could include some type of sock that would slip over the probes to take the delta WB. These could fit into the tool when not in use.

    With my STA2 I could get the CFM and then using the delta WB I could calculate the system BTU/H

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    working overtime
    Posts
    843

    Confused

    Ol I guess o did not read your post clearly enough. That manometer does aloy more than static pressure though. It will give you temp and td and such. I did think thats kind where you were going. My idea would be to take that tool and.add more.features to it. Why cant we just build on that. If you wanna call out a tool company than lets make it fluke. If they could add some probes and do wet bulb than that would be cool. If im still.way off than let me know. Maybe you could reiterate your description.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    working overtime
    Posts
    843
    Also that fluke does velocity and such its not just a monometer its an airflow.tool with many functions.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Vernon Center, MN
    Posts
    35
    from the looks of it IMO i think it would shave a little time off start-ups and some service calls. looks like a handy little tool and as long as the probes weren't heavy i would think they would do ok in duct board, just my opinion tho.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Greenwood IN
    Posts
    439
    OP, check out the Cooper-Atkins MFM300. There is a review of it around here somewhere. I recently got one and it's pretty much everything you want, as I have been looking for a similar tool. I can't say it's perfect, but it will have to do for now, cause it's the only one I could find that does most of what I wanted, and a little extra.
    Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
    -Albert Einstein

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