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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    134
    Anyone used Hytech paints ?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    168
    gsubrec,

    http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load...414627779.html

    Above is a link to a Gardenweb thread which has a little info from folks who have used the HiTech product.

    This subject is a little confusing as two kinds of radiant barrier paint are in view. One has aluminum, like the Sherwin Williams that you are using and the other has this ceramic in it.

    I have not done radiant barrier paint, but if I did, I would use the aluminum paint in the attic and the ceramic product on interior walls and ceilings. Also, exterior if I had a lot of wood. I have ordered a package of the ceramic additive to use on west facing garage doors.

    The nice thing about the ceramic additive is that you can just order packages of the ceramic and add it to any kind of paint. That way you could just add it to a simple home painting project. I think they make a white ceiling paint, also. If this stuff works, it could be helpful in slowing the loss of heat from the interior thru the ceiling in winter.

    As I said, I have not done this, but I live in a climate with very hot summers and pretty cold winters. I would treat the attic with aluminum paint and the interior walls and ceiling with ceramic paint.

    good luck


  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    134
    I found out from Sherwin Williams that the Low E Attic paint they sell is made by Chemrex ( BASF )
    I also found that Chemrex no longer makes the Low E wall and ceiling paint

    Today in NJ, at 2PM, the external temperature was 88F,
    My 80% painted ( Low E attic barrier paint Sherwin Williams ) is 100F, 12 inches below the roof

    This is a single coat

    I painted my attic in many sessions because I could not tolerate the heat in the attic
    When I first started the attic painting, I could not work for more than 2 hours at a stretch due to heat and sweating
    My first session, I worked from 7PM to 9.30PM, to try to reduce my discomfort
    Today I worked from 10AM to 2PM
    My discomfort at 2PM today, when the painting is 80% complete is same as my discomfort at 9.30PM when I first started the painting of attic

  4. #17

    Cool Attic Ventilation for HVAC contractors

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

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    Last edited by jpsmith1cm; 10-08-2012 at 08:00 PM. Reason: non AOP member

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    I'll go dust off my time capsul and let the OP know.... 6 years ago.

    Yo can also apply a vapor barrier and insulation on or under hte roof deck and eliminat hte need for ventilation altogether. Having a roof covering that is only for rain water but not part of your outer shell is kind of stupid when you stop and thing abotu it. So you're trying to put up an umbrella over your house, but make sure it's open toe outdoor air or it will overheat. Why not just do the same as you do with walls, and insulate and block moisture transfer? I foamed under my roof and can't say enough about it's performance, even if the contractor did a sloppy job. It never exceeds 90F in the attic and is only cooled by a single 6" vent... for dehumidification purposes because i don;t have a vapor barrier and used open cell. Should have used closed.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,346
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    I'll go dust off my time capsul and let the OP know.... 6 years ago.

    Yo can also apply a vapor barrier and insulation on or under hte roof deck and eliminat hte need for ventilation altogether. Having a roof covering that is only for rain water but not part of your outer shell is kind of stupid when you stop and thing abotu it. So you're trying to put up an umbrella over your house, but make sure it's open toe outdoor air or it will overheat. Why not just do the same as you do with walls, and insulate and block moisture transfer? I foamed under my roof and can't say enough about it's performance, even if the contractor did a sloppy job. It never exceeds 90F in the attic and is only cooled by a single 6" vent... for dehumidification purposes because i don;t have a vapor barrier and used open cell. Should have used closed.
    Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) did a study comparing eight identically built and unoccupied (but with a/c operable and set to 77F) houses. Seven of the eight had different roofing materials, with one being a "control" home in that it had a conventional roof with insulation on the attic floor. The eighth home had a conventional asphalt roof but was foamed at the roof deck. Out of the seven that did not have foam at the roof deck, it had a white metal reflective roof (standing seam). Two others had reflective materials other than metal; one was white barrel tile and the other white flat tile. It should also be noted that all eight homes had ducts in the attic.

    Effectiveness of reducing peak cooling demand and energy cost between all of the homes were compared against the control home. What I found interesting is that in terms of improving performance over the control home, I expected the foamed roof deck to do the best. It did not. Both tile roofs performed better, and the white reflective metal roof outran them all. I had to wonder why this was so much better than the foamed deck; Tips led me to a Q&A section of the FSEC site where this was explained very well...comes down to a foamed roof deck in many houses has considerably more surface (square footage) area than a ceiling beneath an attic, and that the temperature delta between the roofing material (in instances of dark absorptive roofing, like asphalt) and the bottom side of the foamed deck is greater than the temperature difference between a conventional attic and the ceiling surface in air conditioned space.

    The FSEC study did suggest that highly reflective roofing combined with an insulated roof deck would outperform all of the houses in the study, but this configuration was not a part of the study.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,671
    CastleRoofer

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Additional infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.

    Also, closed 6 year old thread.

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