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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    884
    I know of college grads that are making $12 hr, 20 years out of college. I was married to one. She went back to get her masters degree in an affiliated field. She'll be 50 with 70K in college debt, still not able to work unsupervised until 3000hrs of supervised work are done. I hope it works out for her.

    Education is a door opener in many jobs. It can be background noise in others.


    The great thing about starting HVAC late in life is the experience you've had outside of HVAC. All of my current co-workers are over 35 in the commercial company I'm with now.

    Wow, past my bed time.
    “I am for doing good to the poor, but...I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. I observed...that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”
    ― Benjamin Franklin

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    259
    Quote Originally Posted by valdelocc View Post
    are you taking $75K/year on the paycheck? or total compensation?
    To make 100K thats like $55/hr take home.
    I'm happy here, our rate is $31.50hr on the check, my mortgage is paid, I'm past my prime and looking forward retirement.
    I made $75K in the check when I worked in Miami. I don't work in Miami anymore.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    1,355
    We make good money in DC too. There wasn't one single year that I didn't clear 100K after becoming a journeyman up until I started my own thing. I think my highest year was 126K, of course there was overtime, incentive pay and bonuses involved, but that's still a hell of a good living for a tradesman working for someone else.
    Saving the world...one service call at a time.

  4. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChillerMan View Post
    Nothing.

    I am an hourly service tech. I make a high hourly wage. With that and about 60 hours O/T a year I clear six figures. The point of my post was to prove that no, you don't have to go to college to make excellent money, especially as a craftsman/tradesman. If you work hard, and improve yourself over time you can make excellent money and have an excellent quality of life.
    Dear Friend,

    I am new to canada and i am planning to start work in the field of HAVAC but i dont know how to start and from where to start, I am planning to go for educational course and if u can suggest me i will be very thank full to u. I dont know any kind of apprentiship programme but if you can give me guidance i would love to go through it. At last i am a civil engineer from india and very sound in technical field so i dont think this will be any tough matter for me. kindly give me some suggesation or you can mail me direct as well.

    Thanking you
    Satish

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    east kansas
    Posts
    8,033
    It's all relative.

    I'm happy driving the gravel road instead of sitting in traffic. I'll make less but I hope my quality of life ranks with the 100K plus.

    I don't eat lunch out much, but spent $8.60 at Pizza Hut for a lunch buffet with salad and a drink. How much does it cost in the areas that pay 100K? Just for comparison sake.

    Also, there are only so many nice jobs that pay the top dollar. The rest of us will have to bottom feed. For those that have them, good job!

    I don't think I'll ever fully retire. Once my youngest daughter is out of college I'll look for a part time gig. I think some smaller companies around here would have a position open for a peak season mechanic. That is if I can afford to work part time. That is my cost for not jumping enough ships to land a plumb job.
    Beware of advice given by some guy on the Internet.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    In a mechanical room....
    Posts
    1,888
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChillerMan View Post
    I made $75K in the check when I worked in Miami. I don't work in Miami anymore.
    725
    “It takes courage to grow up and turn out to be who you really are.”

    - E.E. Cummings

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Posts
    220

    Smile

    got caught with the open thread line, and heck yeah its bright, its so bright I need 3m polarized safety glasses when I look to the future I just got of trade with a major in HVAC and a certificate for industrial maintenance and going back in the fall for mechanical refrigeration/system controls/residential wiring/NEC code 1 etc.. 12 units and probably going to make a run at NATE later this fall, heck yeah its bright. I am going to be takin g classes/seminars till I retire and even after that probably just to stay in the loop that my life/education/passion is geared towards. I am 32 now and I know the cookie cutter hvac private fat tuition have to take out 27,000 student loans for the program type schools are pushing them out just as fast as they are enrolling them and competition is fierce in my area but I still like my chances of actually putting my degree to work in a field my education was geared for. I was on a unit today testing out a ECM ID blower, it was 106 outside and I love it, can't wait til I can be in a service truck one day but for now going to take advantage of other opportunites and stay HVAC focused. you guys have a cool one and stay hydrated

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    Where I work as an apprentice, the two owners of the company both have bachelors degrees, HVAC state licenses, 70 employees and are very wealthy.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Fresno, CA
    Posts
    220
    theres a outfit like that where I live and everyone wants to work for them, they are union I believe and they do a damn good job, all hard working all educated and they are pretty respected. When I was job searching was checking out there website and man all the higher ups have BA. BS a couple have masters, its crazy. People don't realize how passionate some people are about the trade, they think blue collar is just getting dirty working with grime or construction in overalls or a hardhat but alot of the guys in hvac are on their game. I often attend seminars with IHACI through southern california edison in Tulare california and there is a presenter that runs service and hes just a animal when it comes to information, he holds 19 of the N.A.T.E certifications and I believe there is only one other guy who holds that distinction and he is from Texas. And WMG my plans are getting a good 5-7 years in the field and getting several N.A.T.E certs myself and moving to amarillo/lubbock area with my wife family, I really took a liking to north texas, just wish there was more lakes in that area, went to lake meredith I believe man that was a bunch of pea soup, here in central cal I have a lake 20 minutes north of me along with 2 others 40 minutes north of that and 1 large bass fishing resevoir south about an 50 minutes so were pretty spoiled with places to bass fish, fly fish for trout and bass on the fly. Have a cool one

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    HVAC takes multiple skillsets and puts them all into one. Electrical, plumbing, customer service, sales are all utilized in this industry. Plus not just anyone can learn the trade in a year or two. Amarillo/lubbock? Have you thought about Austin or San Antonio? Apparently the stretch between Austin and Houston is going to be the next big something or another to do with computers. Fishing is great. Bass, Catfish, crappie are all here.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    As with any trade, the wise person increases his knowledge with age, so that when the body begins to balk, they are able to make their living with their brains.

    A person who declines to train to do service, in favor of staying an installer, deserves no sympathy when his body shoots him the finger.

    Work smarter, not harder. This trade is wide open for anybody who has the drive and ambition to become a true technician.

    I know guys who did this well into their 80's. Sure, they needed a helper for the last ten years or so, but they were still well worth it, for the knowledge that they had between their ears. And they weren't doing it for the money, they were doing it because they loved it.
    Well said. The gray headed (or bald) techs should be kept around. They seem to be able to solve the problems the rest of us can't and can teach the rest of us a thing or two.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by s.rajkotia View Post
    Dear Friend,

    I am new to canada and i am planning to start work in the field of HAVAC but i dont know how to start and from where to start, I am planning to go for educational course and if u can suggest me i will be very thank full to u. I dont know any kind of apprentiship programme but if you can give me guidance i would love to go through it. At last i am a civil engineer from india and very sound in technical field so i dont think this will be any tough matter for me. kindly give me some suggesation or you can mail me direct as well.

    Thanking you
    Satish

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    1,390

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