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  1. #1
    Question Please

    What causes compressor burnout, and how do you tell if that has occured?


    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Alot of things. Acid in the system,excessive temps,factory faults,mis- wiring,low voltage,voltage spikes,etc.

    You can tell when compressor doesn't run, and you open system up to acidic conditions(contaminated freon).
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    230
    Originally posted by onionhead
    What causes compressor burnout
    Most common cause: incompetent installation, followed by poor service.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    30
    If the contactor at the compressor is energized but nothing is happening, no fan, no cold refrigerant to the coil, nothing, would this be compressor burnout?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    230
    Probably not.

    Sounds like it is time to call a professional.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    30
    Yes, I intend to. Air handler cfm increases as usual(York variable speed blower), but zilch at the compressor. As an electrician, after the contactor is energized and pulled in, that is where I make the handoff to you HVAC guys!

  7. #7
    Originally posted by onionhead
    What causes compressor burnout, and how do you tell if that has occured?
    In most cases, high temperature, FOLLOWED BY acid formation.

    How can you tell? If the compressor refuses to start, check for acidity.

    http://www.air-conditioner-selection...intenance.html

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,852
    The term "burnout" is used way too much in our industry for referring to simply failed compressors. A true burnout condition is quite easily identified by the acrid odor of the refrigerant oil and the acidity of that oil as well as the discoloration.

    Without an oil sample, there is no way to determine if the compressor is a burnout.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    211
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    The term "burnout" is used way too much in our industry for referring to simply failed compressors. A true burnout condition is quite easily identified by the acrid odor of the refrigerant oil and the acidity of that oil as well as the discoloration.

    Without an oil sample, there is no way to determine if the compressor is a burnout.
    I totally agree.

  10. #10
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    Without an oil sample, there is no way to determine if the compressor is a burnout.
    Sure there is. Disconnect the wires to the compressor and measure it with a multimeter. It won't be able to tell if it's an actual burnout, but it can tell if it's bad.

  11. #11
    Originally posted by star882
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    Without an oil sample, there is no way to determine if the compressor is a burnout.
    Sure there is. Disconnect the wires to the compressor and measure it with a multimeter. It won't be able to tell if it's an actual burnout, but it can tell if it's bad.
    Interesting. What should be the estimated reading be? Maybe I can learn something new . Let's hope that this is not DIY.

  12. #12
    Originally posted by mjk_na
    Originally posted by star882
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    Without an oil sample, there is no way to determine if the compressor is a burnout.
    Sure there is. Disconnect the wires to the compressor and measure it with a multimeter. It won't be able to tell if it's an actual burnout, but it can tell if it's bad.
    Interesting. What should be the estimated reading be? Maybe I can learn something new . Let's hope that this is not DIY.
    Pretty simple. A (less than infinite) reading from any terminal to ground is bad. Then check winding resistance to make sure it matches up to datasheet specifications. It won't be able to tell if a turn or two is shorted, but that's when more sophisticated test equipment comes into play.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    230
    I would hope that posting a link to public information otherwise available by a simple search would not be a violation of the Forum rules.

    http://www.inspect-ny.com/aircond/ai...htm#aircond1D3

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