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  1. #1

    XB13 3 ton, XB13 2.5 ton, or XR13 2 ton

    Hi,

    In the past several months I've gotten three estimates on an AC system for our house.

    We have a 2100 sq ft, two level house with one skylight in the Portland Oregon area. It does get hot here, but we have relatively short summers. For each estimate, the proposed system was different:

    1) XB13 2.5 TON 13 SEER X8 TRANE CONDENSER 410A

    2) XR13-024 2 TON TRANE AC

    3) XB13 3 TON 13 SEER X8 TRANE CONDENSER 410A

    Are these all equivalent? Why is the tonnage different on every one? When would a heat pump makes sense? We have a 13 year old lennox gas furnace. I think it's one of the 80% efficiency level units (not sure if my terminology is correct). Just don't know what my next step should be.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    winnipeg
    Posts
    1,330
    one of them might be right ...need a load calculation done
    it was working.... played with it.... now its broke.... whats the going hourly rate for HVAC repair

  3. #3
    They all three did a load calculation, so I'm not sure why they're so different. Could they all be right?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,845
    I am in Portland Oregon and am a Trane dealer if you need help. In Portland you really should at least consider a heat pump if your not against them. My email is Travis @ my username. We perform full load calculations and will show you options.
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Anderson,SC
    Posts
    950
    teg_76

    Did they show u the load cal, manual J?

    What was the sensible and latent load?

    If no,t they need to, post the worksheet and we will help you.

    STUD

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    Quote Originally Posted by teg_76 View Post
    They all three did a load calculation, so I'm not sure why they're so different. Could they all be right?
    No, they cannot all be right. Load Calcs take a lot of information into account including orientation of the structure, shading, insulation values, ect... If these are not input correctly you will get varying results. My advise would be to speak to each of the three people who came out and ask for more detailed information as to how they came up with their loads. If they did their job correctly they will not have any problem talking with you in more detail about it. If they give you a bunch of resistance then you can pretty safely assume that their load is a load.
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    1,976
    Teg

    No existing AC installed?

    I would think a 3 ton XR13 but only a load calc will confirm that.

    And yes, I would consider a HP. If you go that route, new DF thermostat with outdoor sensor should also be installed.

    IMO
    Good Luck!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,390
    Always nice when a HVAC-Talk member is in your town. I'd give Travis a call.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    12,896
    Twilly says keep us posted.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Jurupa Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,643
    Kind of confused on the recomendations to put in heat pump heating when there is already gas furnace on the property... I understand electricity is cheaper in portland than what I'm used to in california, but the natural gas prices out west are still VERY cheap.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by CraziFuzzy View Post
    Kind of confused on the recomendations to put in heat pump heating when there is already gas furnace on the property... I understand electricity is cheaper in portland than what I'm used to in california, but the natural gas prices out west are still VERY cheap.
    In portland on average(of course depends on SEER and AFUE and rates etc) but most systems cost $.86 per 100,000 BTU's using a heat pump(seasonaly adjusted) vs $1.25 per 100,000 BTU's using an 80% gas furnace. The poster also said it is a 13 year old furnace, so if you use a heat pump it could prolong, gas valve, inducer, heat exchanger, burners etc. life spans so less replacement/repair costs down the road while adding AC while saving energy. I average $100 in gas and electric each month in my 1600 sq foot home, most in my neighborhood are $60-$80 in electricity alone and another $60+ in gas average out over the year. Plus adding a heat pump comes with a $200 utility incentive regardless of efficiency here.
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    It depends on your homes construction, but I think the design temp is onlysoemthing like what, 88F? with a dewpoint of maybe the upper 60's. So a unit in Portland is about 1/2 the size of what you'd install in Houston. I think 2 tons might be plenty if you have descent shade and a typical number of windows.

    Teddybear will chime in and tell you that you can probably go with even a 1.5 or 2 Ton and a whole house dehumidifier and save energy and be more comfortable. He's probably right.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    It depends on your homes construction, but I think the design temp is onlysoemthing like what, 88F? with a dewpoint of maybe the upper 60's. So a unit in Portland is about 1/2 the size of what you'd install in Houston. I think 2 tons might be plenty if you have descent shade and a typical number of windows.
    Our design temp is 86 degrees here, so most homes will actually use at most 1 ton per 1,000 sq feet, but we all know there is no rule of them to sizing! There are of course uninsulated houses with all south facing single pane windows.
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

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