Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7
    Me and my roomate tried to put in a programmable thermostat today in order to help regulate the house a bit better.

    We came home with the new product.. which is for a heat pump system (which is what we have). Turned the breakers to the air unit and heating units off and labeled all the wires on the current thermostat.

    We put the new one in per the instructions (with a little help from the toll free number too)..and when we go to fire everything back up nothing works!

    So, the makers of the thermostat say we likely blew a fuse in the central a/c blower. Which I checked.. and shows 0 ohm (OL) on this multimeter.. unless I'm using it wrong??

    Anyway, so I've put the old analog thermostat back in. Again, nothing works. I've checked the breakers on the central unit, the heat pump outside and of course the main breaker box. I've got the old thermo wired exactly how it came off...

    Nothing's goin.. the house is sweltering hot!

    Can anyone give me any advice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7
    forgot, heat pump is a Trane XE 1000


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,932
    First of all, it is "my roomate and I"....geez

    Secondly; you let the operating smoke out of some component in the system and need to have someone who knows what they are doing check this out and repair it.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7
    Dang. So there's nothing I can do? I don't see how we flubbed that up? We followed the directions and even discussed some wiring questions with the thermostat manufacturer...


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    This is not a DIY site, and we are not allowed to give step by step instructions for anything.

    I can offer you 2 bits though.

    1) A fuse that reads 0L on your meter is blown.

    2) If your old thermostat is a Trane Thermostat and you connected the wire that was on the B terminal on the old one to the terminal labeled B or 0/B on the new non Trane thermostat, you will blow the fuse in the indoor unit. On Trane systems, B is 24v AC common.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Las Vegas,Nevada
    Posts
    339
    Originally posted by mindflux
    Dang. So there's nothing I can do? I don't see how we flubbed that up? We followed the directions and even discussed some wiring questions with the thermostat manufacturer...

    The person with whom you spoke is probably not aware of the system.They read everything off of a screen in front of them.Obviously,if you turned every breaker off,hooked it up,nothing,then put the old back on,still nothing,something is screwed up.If it is a blown fuse, that means either something wasn't turned off or "your 800 number" contact is worth nothing.This is why I love to hear people at Home Depot ask for advice from an "ASSociate".I try to sneak them a buss card just after they check out.I know it's not polite but look at where you're at and ask yourself if you'd do it again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    478
    You blew the transformer

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    241
    My neighbour did the same thing....

    Nothing was really blown on his system, just badly wired.

    Check your voltage (24v), start fan, then try cooling / heating cycles w/o connecting t-stat. (use wirenuts or something)

    Now that you tested your system, reconnect tstat. Some t-stats were wired by "hvac experts" so none of the colors is right. In this case look at the board.

    DO NOT TRY HEATPUMP heating cycle when it is hot outside!

    If you blown transformer, no big deal, you are out of $XXXX.

    [Edited by arpa on 06-25-2006 at 10:43 AM]

  9. #9
    Get an HVAC contractor. Ask him/her to correct the problem and observe how he/she does it Learn through experience.

    By the way, electronic wiring (like thermostats) are not the same from one product to another.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7

    0none10

    Originally posted by mark beiser
    This is not a DIY site, and we are not allowed to give step by step instructions for anything.

    I can offer you 2 bits though.

    1) A fuse that reads 0L on your meter is blown.

    2) If your old thermostat is a Trane Thermostat and you connected the wire that was on the B terminal on the old one to the terminal labeled B or 0/B on the new non Trane thermostat, you will blow the fuse in the indoor unit. On Trane systems, B is 24v AC common.

    The fuse I'm testing is a BUSSMAN that came out of my central unit (in the laundry room) (where my air filter goes). It reads 0L. I keep getting conflicting info on that. One person says if it reads 0 it's good, you (and someone else) said if it reads anything in continuity mode it's good.

    The old t-stat is a trane. It's got 8 wires.

    Here they are coming off the old T-stat
    X2 = Black
    T = Brown
    O = Orange
    B = Blue
    Y = Yellow
    R = Red
    G = Green
    W = White

    When I hooked the new one up, the instructions and the 800 number person told me I only needed 5 (even for a heat pump system).

    So I taped off X2 (Black), B (blue) and T (Brown), and connected O, Y, R, G, W to their respective terminals on the new T-Stat (which were the same letters).


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Miami, Fl.
    Posts
    3,559
    Unfortunately, due to site rules we as members can not discuss technical issues with the general public.

    Thank you for your cooperation.

    Thread Closed.

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