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  1. #1

    Can someone explain the A, B, C Card?

    Can someone explain the A, B, C Card HVACR Service to me? Are these all considered Journeyman? Is it called, for example, "B Card HVACR Service Journeyman"? Please enlighten me. I was told the C Card is the Metal Trades Residential Journeyman.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,268
    I might be wrong, but I think it depends on the state you live in. Might check your states website for licensing info or give them a call.

    The way the licensing works at least in Arkansas is how much you want to pay and how well your test scores are determines what you can work on...here are the Arkansas licenses.

    (1) Class A — Entitles the licensee to perform HVACR work without limitation to
    BTUH or horsepower capacities;

    (2) Class B — Entitles the licensee to perform HVACR work on air conditioning systems
    that develop a total of not more than fifteen (15) tons of cooling capacity per unit or one million
    (1,000,000) BTUH heating input per unit and refrigeration systems of fifteen horsepower (15
    h.p.) or less per unit;

    (3) Class C — Entitles the licensee who is in the business of servicing and repairing
    heating, ventilation, air conditioning, or refrigeration equipment for the public to service, repair,
    or replace components of HVACR equipment and to perform HVACR work on air conditioning
    systems that develop a total of not more than fifteen (15) tons of cooling capacity per unit or one HVAC/R*Law*
    11 million (1,000,000) BTUH heating input per unit and refrigeration systems of fifteen horsepower
    (15 h.p.) or less per unit. A Class C license holder shall not install any original HVACR
    equipment or replace any existing HVACR equipment;

    (4) Class D — Entitles the licensee to perform sheet metal work as it relates to ductwork
    for HVACR systems without regard to or limitation of horsepower of the system to which the
    duct connects. The licensee in this category is prohibited from the sale, installation, and service
    of HVACR equipment and systems;

    (5) Class E — Entitles the licensee to perform refrigeration work as defined in 17-33-
    101 without regard to or limitation of horsepower. The licensee in this category is prohibited
    from the sale, installation, and service of heating and air conditioning equipment used for the
    treatment of air for human comfort requirements; and

    (6) Class L — Entitles a licensee to apply for and obtain a restricted lifetime license
    without having to pay a license fee in any specific category of license as defined in this chapter.
    The applicant must be at least sixty-five (65) years of age and hold a current license in good
    standing with the board. The board shall promulgate rules and regulations to define the specific
    requirements of the lifetime license.

  3. #3
    I'm sorry this thread is about the terminology used by some Local Unions. I believe Chicago, Philadelphia, New York and some others are some.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    299
    638 in NY; A is the fitters, B is service/metal trades/whipping boys

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    CHICAGO
    Posts
    51
    A card is journeyman
    B card is 50 tons and under
    C card is apprentice
    Hope it helps

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by honeywell kid View Post
    A card is journeyman
    B card is 50 tons and under
    C card is apprentice
    Hope it helps
    In Chicago, are you sure an C Card isn't a Metal Trades Journeyman?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anytown USA
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    2,060
    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicallyInclined View Post
    In Chicago, are you sure an C Card isn't a Metal Trades Journeyman?
    It is..

    Also I think B card goes up to 200 ton.

  8. #8
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    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,716

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    208
    A Card = Your Daddy or Uncle is a fitter/member, and they like you

    B Card = A relative is a fitter/member, and they don't like you

    C Card = You don't know anybody in the local, and they need a low paid guy to do work they don't want to do

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
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    1,386
    Quote Originally Posted by softtail View Post
    A Card = Your Daddy or Uncle is a fitter/member, and they like you

    B Card = A relative is a fitter/member, and they don't like you

    C Card = You don't know anybody in the local, and they need a low paid guy to do work they don't want to do
    thats pretty much the way it goes.
    In my local we dont have the abc clasifications, most service techs are BTJ similar to A card, then we have MES and thats like C card, they are now using another classification "light commercial and residential" the total package very similar to MES, 60% to 80% of BTJ.
    There is fierce opposition among services techs to the program, the pipefitters/plumbers union leaders and some owners are the driving force behind it.
    when they threw you into one of those classification you'll never get out of it.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by valdelocc View Post
    thats pretty much the way it goes.
    In my local we dont have the abc clasifications, most service techs are BTJ similar to A card, then we have MES and thats like C card, they are now using another classification "light commercial and residential" the total package very similar to MES, 60% to 80% of BTJ.
    There is fierce opposition among services techs to the program, the pipefitters/plumbers union leaders and some owners are the driving force behind it.
    when they threw you into one of those classification you'll never get out of it.
    By MES, do you mean Service Craftsman a.k.a. Serviceman? My home Local has the same classification with the Service Journeyman above Sm and the Service Tradesman below Sm. These classifications come from the NSMA.
    I was looking into going into the AZ Local, they don't have Servicemen or Tradesmen. Their Jm is basically a Sm and their Applied Jm is a Jm. Please also remember that I'm talking HVACR Service, not Building Trades Refrigeration Pipe Fitters a.k.a. RefrigerationFitters. All these Local classifications got my head spinning.
    This is what I've been told, in Chicago - A Card is Jm (Applied), B Card is Sm (Com. Ref.) and C Card is MT Jm (Res./LC). If this is correct, is it how most of the Card systems work?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    17
    The Chicago breakdown for stationary engineers as far as cards\titles are concerned is as follows..........1)Chief....2)Assistant Chief........3)A Card.......4)C Card.....5)Apprentice.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    193
    Does anyone know why they call it metal trades when you can't touch steel pipe or sheetmetal?

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