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  1. #1
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    May 2011
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    Cleaning evap coils in display cases

    I'm wondering how often the refrigeration mechanics here recommend cleaning evap coils for display cases? Every time I've taken the back panel off to look at an evap coil in one of our cases it is sparkling clean...I'm thinking they stay clean due to defrost water? Don't know why this isn't the case with walk in evap coils as they get all covered in crap, but like I said...the coils in the cases tend to be very clean even with no PMs on them???

  2. #2
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceneck
    I'm wondering how often the refrigeration mechanics here recommend cleaning evap coils for display cases? Every time I've taken the back panel off to look at an evap coil in one of our cases it is sparkling clean...I'm thinking they stay clean due to defrost water? Don't know why this isn't the case with walk in evap coils as they get all covered in crap, but like I said...the coils in the cases tend to be very clean even with no PMs on them???
    I can't think of too many display cases that require a regular evaporator cleaning.

    Can't give a good explanation as to why, either.

    On that, I'd say as needed.

    Cleaning the case itself is far more important.

  3. #3
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    May 2011
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    CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Cleaning the case itself is far more important.
    Totally...my eyes were wide opened when I saw the state of the wells for our cases when I first started...partially plugged up cond. drains and THICK slime growing on top. That's all changed now, but there were several refrigeration mechanics that I asked about this and they were like "man, you have no idea how many stores have that same amount of slime and muck growing in the bottom of the cases." I'd think it'd be a great way for Legionnaire's disease (among others) to spread...but have never heard of that happening before...yet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    The Pas, Manitoba Canada
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    Had to lift the hinged evap fan housing on a coffin freezer one time and found an air drill with the bit still in it. It was pretty rusty by then.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by K_Neil View Post
    Had to lift the hinged evap fan housing on a coffin freezer one time and found an air drill with the bit still in it. It was pretty rusty by then.
    Must have been 4:59 on a Friday.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2011
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    The "crap" you speak of on walk in evaps is dust created from the cardboard boxes.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

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    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Southern New Jersey
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    The evap coils rarely become dirty. The case honey combs/ baffles/ back walls in the case are far more likely to become plugged before the coil.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayray84 View Post
    The evap coils rarely become dirty. The case honey combs/ baffles/ back walls in the case are far more likely to become plugged before the coil.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2000
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    Guayaquil EC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceneck View Post
    I'm wondering how often the refrigeration mechanics here recommend cleaning evap coils for display cases? Every time I've taken the back panel off to look at an evap coil in one of our cases it is sparkling clean...I'm thinking they stay clean due to defrost water? Don't know why this isn't the case with walk in evap coils as they get all covered in crap, but like I said...the coils in the cases tend to be very clean even with no PMs on them???
    I believe you are correct about the self-cleaning aspect of most evaporator coils. Whatever collects on them will tend to be drained away with the condensate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rayray84 View Post
    The evap coils rarely become dirty. The case honey combs/ baffles/ back walls in the case are far more likely to become plugged before the coil.
    This is true...and quite common.

    My theory as to why the coils stay clean and the stuff downstream of them get dirty is this:

    The coils are typically frosted, not wet. A wet coil will cause more dust to stick. Some dust will collect on a frosted coil, only to be washed away during defrost, but most of the dust goes on through. I suppose the relatively wide fin spacing helps this a bit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Southern New Jersey
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    I may be wrong. But a walk in box
    Cooler coil is just as " wet " as your describing a case coil to be. Besides the honeycombs and baffles collecting dust have you ever taken a look at the hvac filters on the evap after about 3 weeks. They are usually plugged solid. Open cases create a air band keeping the non sense out. And the store return ducts to suck it all in.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    257
    I have a few high velocity coils in a a large produce cooler that get plugged from the dirt that comes off the produce, wash the "mud" out of those every couple of years.

    Wash out the entire case with a hose, remove back wall if possible, remove honeycomb and wash the entire air path. Some models have baffles in the back wall as well as the top. I used to place a bag and a rubber band over each motor ( found in produce dept )

    Some chains used to pay me to do it at night, those days are long gone. I must be fair, some chains do have cleaning programs but normally its just the fresh meat cases.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Palmdale ca with my brothers
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rayray84 View Post
    The evap coils rarely become dirty. The case honey combs/ baffles/ back walls in the case are far more likely to become plugged before the coil.
    I have to deal with cleaning the Tyler cases that Costco uses for there deli islands about every 8 months. The face of the coils plug up 100% due to the fin spacing for energy.

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