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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    877

    I beg your pardon sir !

    commtech77- I am also a recent Chicago transplant, if you consider 1982 recent. I have been doing commercial, industrial type HVAC since. This includes replacing cooling tower motors, bearings in triple digits and 90%+ humidity. I have shown a lot of Texans a thing or two and they in turn have also taught me many things.-GEO
    Once in a while everything falls into place and I am able to move forward, most of the time it just falls all over the place and I can't go anywhere-GEO

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    127
    I take it, none of you guys start early 5am to 1:30pm? I think that's what they do in AZ and NV

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185

    Thumbs down

    Sounds like it may be to hot for the average tech to endure. Have anyone you worked somewhere were it was worse heat wise?

    In the Persain Gulf in 98 I worked on Helicopters on the night shift. The low temp during the summer months was 100 degrees farenheit. The Air Conditioner was not sufficient at all so when I slept during the day I slept in a coat of sweat. Sleeping in sweat sucks.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Posts
    1,818
    Just stay out of resi service jobs. I did an attic job last year that it was 145* in there. I came down out of the attic and it was 105* outside and I was shivering.
    Nemo me impune lacessit.

    How much blood do I have to bathe in to get clean?

    Don't look down on anyone unless you're helping them up.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Paper Street Soap Company
    Posts
    2,304
    Quote Originally Posted by ga1279 View Post
    commtech77- I am also a recent Chicago transplant, if you consider 1982 recent. I have been doing commercial, industrial type HVAC since. This includes replacing cooling tower motors, bearings in triple digits and 90%+ humidity. I have shown a lot of Texans a thing or two and they in turn have also taught me many things.-GEO
    I hear you and dont doubt it one bit. It is an extreme environment and it takes a tough person to work in it.

    I blame the person not the city. I was in Chicago last winter watching my oldest graduate from the Navy.

    No place for a Southern boy.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Paper Street Soap Company
    Posts
    2,304
    Quote Originally Posted by alikair View Post
    I take it, none of you guys start early 5am to 1:30pm? I think that's what they do in AZ and NV
    Really ? I start as early as the customer will let me but its rarely before 7.

    I dont see how that schedules possible ? How can you ignore a hot call at 2 in the afzetnoon ?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    127
    Quote Originally Posted by commtech77 View Post
    Really ? I start as early as the customer will let me but its rarely before 7.

    I dont see how that schedules possible ? How can you ignore a hot call at 2 in the afzetnoon ?
    To be honest, i don't know. I have never worked in a state that does this early shift, was only told about it, or maybe lie I was lied to. not sure, any case it was in Arizona that the supposedly worked this early.

    I'm just trying to figure out If I would be able to handle the horrible heat you guys endure for what, like 4 months out of the year.

    I lived in Florida for a year, it sucked but I could handle that. granted I was much younger and was not doing HVAC on rooftops.
    I lived and worked Hvac for many years in Hawaii and never complained about the weather. but then again, Oregon has harsher summers then Hawaii.

    And before someone laughs at Oregon summers, I need to point out, its not the heat, its the sun. the lack of humidity blocking the UV rays makes the sun feel like a brain cooker even if its only 95-105 out.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by alikair View Post
    I lived in Florida for a year, it sucked but I could handle that. granted I was much younger and was not doing HVAC on rooftops.
    The rooftops aren't that big of a deal....it's the attics that make or break you.....you know it's hot, when you're in an attic, and your glasses fog from the inside....
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Paper Street Soap Company
    Posts
    2,304
    The roofs are survivable if you use your head. Stay out of the attics.

    In the lsst 15 yesrs I bet Ive climbed as much as I walked. Those roof ladders will keep the wieght off.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Dallas ,Texas
    Posts
    3,724
    Quote Originally Posted by commtech77 View Post
    Its a registration through the Texas dept of licensing and regulations.

    Its been around a while but now its more or less mandatory. Every customer we have wants copies of the technicians state and EPA license along with the insurance.
    There are 2 types of licenses. You have the basic contractors license A or B and you have the technician license. The tech one is basically a background check thing.
    UA 100

    It takes three people to do anything around here. Two do the work, one explains to the crowd of people who showed up when they seen smoke and flames.

  11. #24
    Actually there's the TACLA******C, TACLA******E, TACLA******R, TACLB******C, TACLB******E, and TACLB******R licences for contractors. Last letter E means Environmental AC, R means Commercial/Industrial Refrigeration and C means combined. Fifth letter means B up to 25TR and A means infinite TR.
    There's both ACR Certification or ACR Registration for Mechanics.
    I think all of this is a joke in TX since just about anybody can pass the contractors exam. The license numbers are already in the 30,000s! Not only that, but the "state" contractors license isn't even good for more than one location. Example, if you have shops in two or three different cities you need multiple license numbers. So much for a state licence, huh?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicallyInclined View Post
    Actually there's the TACLA******C, TACLA******E, TACLA******R, TACLB******C, TACLB******E, and TACLB******R licences for contractors. Last letter E means Environmental AC, R means Commercial/Industrial Refrigeration and C means combined. Fifth letter means B up to 25TR and A means infinite TR.
    There's both ACR Certification or ACR Registration for Mechanics.
    I think all of this is a joke in TX since just about anybody can pass the contractors exam. The license numbers are already in the 30,000s! Not only that, but the "state" contractors license isn't even good for more than one location. Example, if you have shops in two or three different cities you need multiple license numbers. So much for a state licence, huh?
    No. You can only have one license....unless you have a class A of one type, and a class B of another, and they both have to be linked to the same business.

    One license, one business. One license holder can't open up multiple companies.

    The contractor's exam is not a test of your knowledge or experience. It is a test of your library skills. I know some guys who never passed it, some guys who failed it multiple times before passing, and some who passed it on the first try.

    Whether or not they know what they're doing is subject to debate.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Dallas ,Texas
    Posts
    3,724
    Quote Originally Posted by MechanicallyInclined View Post
    Actually there's the TACLA******C, TACLA******E, TACLA******R, TACLB******C, TACLB******E, and TACLB******R licences for contractors. Last letter E means Environmental AC, R means Commercial/Industrial Refrigeration and C means combined. Fifth letter means B up to 25TR and A means infinite TR.
    There's both ACR Certification or ACR Registration for Mechanics.
    I think all of this is a joke in TX since just about anybody can pass the contractors exam. The license numbers are already in the 30,000s! Not only that, but the "state" contractors license isn't even good for more than one location. Example, if you have shops in two or three different cities you need multiple license numbers. So much for a state licence, huh?
    Hey be easy I'm in the 30,000 range!!!!!
    UA 100

    It takes three people to do anything around here. Two do the work, one explains to the crowd of people who showed up when they seen smoke and flames.

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