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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17
    Im here in Fl, just graduated and am looking for a job.

    One job has offered a truck to do PM and selling air purrification systems. This job pays well and has great benefits but it puts me in a position where I dont think I will be able to put my troubleshooting skills to work. (Im worried I might lose something in the transition from school to sevice tech by doing just PM and selling)

    Second job has offered basically an apprenticeship possition being a helper for an experienced service tech. Here I think it would be a great transition from my schooling. This job doesent pay anywhere close to where I think I should be nor do they have good benefits. This company is a little more laid back and would be the better working enviornment.

    What would you do? Please respond asap. If you can that is.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17
    Thanks for viewing but I really could use some advice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Miami, Fl.
    Posts
    3,559
    OK,
    What part of Florida as there are a number of members on this board that have businesses in FL.
    That guy ARPA is one of 'em..

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17
    North central florida

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    1,649
    i dont know jack about florida other than they are always getting hit with hurricanes!

    what i do know is that there is still alot to learn doing p.m.s
    not all of the equipment you will be checking will be working. some you will have to trouble shoot. besides what better way to see a wide variety of equipment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Grand Cayman Island
    Posts
    134

    Hmm

    If you are doing a PM you should be checking motor amps, belt/pulley condition, and looking for problems with the equipment.
    If you just change the filters and leave you are missing the point of your training and the reason you are sent to the job. Your training allows you to do PREVENTIVE Maintenance. The whole concept of Preventive Maintenance is to find a problem before it happens. You have to develope the skills to evaulate the equipment and suggest repairs prior to them occuring.
    This goes to the old saying that the job is what you make of it. You may be to fresh from school to find a problem before it happen. You will have to decide if that is true than you may want to take the other job and develope the skills you need.
    Good Luck
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]merken1[/FONT]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    right, here! in the heartland of the homeland!
    Posts
    737

    george

    If i were you , id keep the higher paying job, it means that they value you , and your help, and are willing to invest in you!

    next, id take some furthering courses in the eve, in ongoing
    commercial ystems, controls etc;
    so that you can write your ticket, when youre ready to make some real dough!
    and do less labor!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    17
    Thanks you two for you input, I have decided to go with the second job learning from the experienced. In no way was I trying to bash PM, I just felt for myself I needed to see more problems as quick as I can. My instuctor told the class that we should try to get on as an apprentice for the first season of cooling/heating, that way we would be for the most part well rounded having seen 80-85% of the problems we would encounter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    right, here! in the heartland of the homeland!
    Posts
    737

    George

    Now , I remember when i was faced with the same thing, i said to myself , i didnt pay 8k to change filters all day long or to do install, since i completed a service course.
    or carry someones ladder or tools around for them, nor take a job that i couldnt use my school taught skills or get somewhere in this trade!
    so, i took the job that was going to get me the skills i needed.
    and it helped, I enjoyed learning, and doing what i went to school for, sometimes you have to be comfortable at the place you work to enjoy what type of work you actually do!

    if you like what you do, you will be better at it and take pride and interest in it, and everybody benefits!

    your work will speak for itself!
    and the lack of experience, will be the only thing that will hold you back, financially.
    your work merits, can only be appreciated by the company that sees your work, in comparison to other techs in the trade, if service is your field, the same should apply in install.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    831
    In some ways, PMs are harder than service work. You're looking for problems that nobody knows about yet. Then you have to explain to customer why they should fix something that aint broke!
    eventu rerum stolidi didicere magistro

  11. #11
    capasitor Guest
    Best paying jobs in the trade are in the DC, Maryland, Virginia area!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    169

    Thumbs up

    best paying jobs are in phx az. hot hot hot. most people cant hang but the ones who do make 6 figures. contact air conditioning by jay inc. kevin morriston svc manager 480-922-4455.

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