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  1. #1
    We're closing on a new house outside of Phoenix Area (verrado). This house is 5,000 square feet and has 3 air handlers all of different sizes.

    #1, downstairs kitchen / dining / family room. Tstat located between kitchen and family room.

    #2, upstairs 4 bedrooms (master suite) Tstat located in upstairs hall near return.

    #3, downstairs living room, downstairs bedroom, downstairs bath. The return is in the ceiling in the upstairs hall, and the T stat is located in the upstairs hall. Yes this tstat ONLY controls downstair living space.

    Does #3 seem right to you??? I asked the builder, he said it's this way to get a sense of the air flowing into the return. But to me, that is only sensing the upstairs temp and could be 100% different than downstairs where the tstat should be located (even though return is upstairs - which I think is wrong too.)

    Am I off base?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    As a rule, Thermostat should sit in the zone it serves

    i.e., the thermostat #3 should sit in the are around downstairs living room, downstairs bedroom,

    BUT NOT in downstairs bathroom for obvious reason.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    Stat in bath????

    It seems perfectly commonsense that the thermostat needs to sit in the area it controls. I have never ever heard of a thermostat in a bathroom, but it's not obvious to me what calamity would occur if it were. Would you be so kind as to explain the obvious reason?

    Thank you -- Pstu


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    996
    Do you think that maybe having a hot shower might have some effect on the tstat? Also very high humidity area, not the best for the contacts inside the tstat.
    "Go big or Go Home"

  5. #5

    Confusion

    Originally posted by mhunterdts
    #3, downstairs living room, downstairs bedroom, downstairs bath. The return is in the ceiling in the upstairs hall, and the T stat is located in the upstairs hall. Yes this tstat ONLY controls downstair living space.
    Folks, the thermostat is NOT located at the bathroom It is located in upstairs hall (dry area), near the return of downstair living space.

    By the way, I would put the thermostat near zone 3, rather than upstairs. The on/off signal will be sent according to the condition around the thermostat i.e. zone 3.

    Do you have only one return for all the rooms in zone 3?

    Why the return is upstairs?

    Are you feeling comfortable now?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    Just how extreme

    I know the real house does not and will not have a t-stat located in the bathroom. If the original poster will forgive us, I wanted to expand my knowledge of building science by asking about the obvious reason not to. Except the reasoning is not so obvious to me.


    >>Do you think that maybe having a hot shower might have some effect on the tstat?
    >>Also very high humidity area, not the best for the contacts inside the tstat.


    I guess an extremely long hot shower in a confined bathroom, might well give the tstat a reading which is false for the house. Humidity? Are we talking about over 70%? And if so why are we worried about the tstat's health, and not a mold colony which threatens human health? If it is under 70% then it is in the same range as many (unfortunate) houses already are.

    My own bathroom is larger, one of those with two sinks and some elbow room as a luxury, but I do have a humidity meter in it and only see 60-65% RH in the short time after a shower. If I did not have a dehumidifier elsewhere in the house I believe 70-75% would be a normal peak, but 60-65% would be the overall average.

    I know my questions must be frustrating to you, but that is the logic I see, the facts that I observe.

    Best wishes -- Pstu

  7. #7
    A good way around it is by having a large grill at the bottom of the bathroom door, and a duct (with extractor) towards the outside of the house. This way, the conditioned air from outside the bathroom can enter, thus conditioning the space as well.

    In addition to that, bathrooms and WCs are suggested to have extractor, towards outside.

  8. #8
    Of course the tstat is not located in the bathroom! So let's forget about that...

    The house is just being finished (we close this week). I'm arguing with the builder (from a common sense perspective) that a tstat upstairs to control downstairs makes no sense at all. The way it is now, you are just sensing the upstairs temp to make a decision about heating/cooling downstairs.

    The model home does have the tstat downstairs which makes PERFECT sense. Evidently there was no room to run the return from the attic down to the 1st floor (which is the better way to do it).

    When we visited the home (114F outside) all tstats were at 74F, and the house seemed comfy. But when we start paying the electricity bill, 76 or 78 may not be so good. Who knows?

    If the builder refuses, I guess we have no choice, but then down the road to relocate the tstat ourselves... It just seems SO wrong to me.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    Is the basement finished?

    This is crucial because if you want to relocate the thermostat, the easiest way to accomplish this is to abandon the existing low-voltage wiring to tstat #3 upstairs and simply run wiring DIRECTLY from furnace to zone #3 (does the furnace sit in the basement?). Then relocate the thermostat.

    Again, if basement unfinished, pretty easy to do. Simply locate the spot you want to have the thermostat, drill through the floor between studs, then make a small hole in the drywall in zone 3 and use a snake to pass the wiring down the basement. Basically straightforward.

    BTW...weird-thinking (or not thinking) builder (or HVAC company).

    The reason I mentioned no tstat in bathroom is just for the sake of completeness (you mentioned the bath in zone 3) and strictly for discussion.

    For "pstu", bathroom is a bad location for tstat because:
    - very often the humidistat is there and RH fluctuates quite a bit in bath (especially if one takes along shower)

    - bath usually has small volume (in cubic feet) and if someone shuts the door, temp is uneven, not representative of the house.

    - humidity in bathroom can corrode electrical contacts in tstat device




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    CN, I appreciate your taking the time to explain the reasons to me!

    Best wishes -- Pstu

  11. #11
    Originally posted by mhunterdts
    If the builder refuses, I guess we have no choice, but then down the road to relocate the tstat ourselves... It just seems SO wrong to me.
    Relocating it close to zone 3 would give you the comfort you need.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    Originally posted by mhunterdts
    Of course the tstat is not located in the bathroom! So let's forget about that...

    The house is just being finished (we close this week). I'm arguing with the builder (from a common sense perspective) that a tstat upstairs to control downstairs makes no sense at all. The way it is now, you are just sensing the upstairs temp to make a decision about heating/cooling downstairs.

    The model home does have the tstat downstairs which makes PERFECT sense. Evidently there was no room to run the return from the attic down to the 1st floor (which is the better way to do it).

    When we visited the home (114F outside) all tstats were at 74F, and the house seemed comfy. But when we start paying the electricity bill, 76 or 78 may not be so good. Who knows?

    If the builder refuses, I guess we have no choice, but then down the road to relocate the tstat ourselves... It just seems SO wrong to me.
    If it aint broke don't fix it.
    It was comfy and read 74° with 114° outdoor. I'd note your issue with the contractor to fix if the #3 zone doesn't regulate as you desire after moving in. I would want as high a return as I could get (and as you apparently have)in a hot area like yours.

    You said you visited a model home so there is more than one of your house plan built already (I assume). I suspect the installer had some insights here on previous issues.

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