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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    933
    My inlaws are building a new home and plan on having a wood stove in the living room, I am wondering about combustion air for this big fella, i am in the process of getting the specs, it is a free standing UL list wood burning stove the room is a probably 350square 8foot ceilings, 90-plus furnace in the garage, am I asking for trouble?
    Still learning opinions welcome.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    What exactly are you asking? If the stove has the option, and it probably does. Install an outside air kit with the shortest run possible. Why not have a professional do the work, it will be worth it if you have lots of questions or doubts about how to do things.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    933
    I am looking at it like it is another furnace, water heater or any other appliance that requires combustion air. I assume that it is going to draw air like these, i do not know, I am a furnace and ac guy, my concern is that it will be starving for combustion air, drawing it from any source it can get it, kitchen vent, fart fan ect. I do not plan to do any of the work on this stove. I am however responsible for the hvac, which includes supply&returns in said area.
    How does a stove effect my layout?
    Still learning opinions welcome.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    if its sealed combustion the recomended primary air source is an outside air kit. the install manuals usually have a lot of info about drafting and all that stuff. Could also ask the place installing it. I am not a total expert on wood burning so I cant give as much info as you would maybe like. I know more about gas units.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,175

    Cool MUA

    A combustion air kit may only need to provide ~10-30 CFM. Being a modern EPA Phase II stove, it will be tight and not need much dilution & excess air. Still, a good stove might withstand btw -5 to -15 Pascals of depressurization. Your concern should be Make Up Air for the combustion appliances and balancing the entire house.
    As JTP is alluding to, if your stove shop is on the ball, they can assist you in this matter. If they are clueless, better do some homework.

    If the house is balanced with proper MUA, all the combustion appliances should be happy. How to balance it?
    Do the arithmetic on all the air in & out. Next, study the top of the thermal envelope of the house to see every pin hole you can seal. Any can ceiling lights should be IC rated. Pay close attn. to the attic access and weatherstripping it well.
    Next, provide MUA low in the home. Preferrably a powered ssytem slaved to the 2 largest air hogs.
    Now, seal all the duct work with duct mastic.
    Last, when the house is completed, measure the duct flows and balance along with a Worst Case Depressurization Test. Then test the appliances themselves for proper operation including combustion analysis.

    I'd put in writing the stove shop must install the stove to its listing and NFPA 211 stds. The house overall should comply with ASHRAE 62.2 for MUA requirements along with the gas code.

    HTH,

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/ Try this place out .It's a great place for wood burning stove help

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Lisle,Illinois
    Posts
    526

    Cool

    Depending on the rated heat output,which may change the class a flue size,check with your outlaws to make sure they know how much heat their choice of model can produce.I see way too many oversize stoves driving people out of their living spaces.
    Ethics are as important as education.

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