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Thread: brine chillers

  1. #1
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    brine chillers

    anyone got experiance dealing with chillers using a brine solution other than glycol?

  2. #2
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    yes

    Mainly absorbers though.

    What is the application?

  3. #3
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    The use of Brine is nasty-nasty stuff... It's good for operating down to 0f as it will freeze at -6f. It all depends on how low you wanna' go with the temperature. Other secondary refrigerants not including the Glycols are things such as d-Lemonene and if you really want to get cold the use of ammonia can get you down to a temperature of even -200f if so inclined.
    I don't know which is the worst, working om a bromide absorber or a brine system pump. Both make your fancy Snap-On tools look like they were used on the Arc.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  4. #4
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    I work with brine.... I hate it .... get it on your shoes and they curl up like a set of elf boots....

  5. #5
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    arizona
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    heatingman
    yes
    Mainly absorbers though.

    What is the application?
    ive got a customer who is looking for alternatives other than glycol for
    a lower freeze point in the water that they are sending down into a mine aprox 4000 feet below the surface. its currently being used to cool the rock(high water loss) and when completed(at 7000 feet below the surface) to cool the mine.
    they dont want glycol going to their treatment plant.

    sorry im talking the chilled water not refrigerent
    Last edited by mhamilton247; 04-30-2012 at 02:39 PM. Reason: dont want confusion

  6. #6
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    Exclamation

    Wow!!!! 7000' in a common supply/return chill water system equates to over 3000psi static pressure. Before the huge French goldmine in the Dakota's closed down, they had several York screw chillers at the 2 mile level where the Geo-thermal tempertature was already around 110f. The cooling towers above ground with float controlled tanks every 200' to keep the static pressure <150psi. Getting the water back up was a problem as many----many pumps were series to get the water back to the cooling towers. The 95f water lvg the condenser became 110-115f by the time it reached the cooling towers. I have nooooo' idea how much the chilled water will be raised using that scenerio but I am certain it will be raised somewhat.
    The De-Beers diamond mine out of J'burg So. Africa has many chillers and the cooling towers down at the 2 and 3 mile level where the Geo-Thermal temperature approaches 140f and chilled water is a must. The gigantic air-shafts pump 90-95f air down the air shafts where it heats to 140f Entering the cooling towers. (My tool box and spare parts are still down there...I went down once...I came up.....NEVER again)
    To this lowly scribe, I cannot imagine one worrying about the freeze point of thier chill water. If I was in one of the tunnels I don't see the difference in drowning in salt water vs. fresh water though shoud a pipe break or whatever.
    Almost 3 miles of pipes full of cold water would be a lot of water fer' sure...
    7000'X2-14,000 feet of piping.
    I wish you luck on this one....Ya' gonna' need it...
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Chicago area
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    Well, with that much pipe to fill, you'll need something cheap.

    What kind of temp does the chiller need to run, on the waterside?

    Either way, you need to get the OEM's engineering dept. involved to find a suitable solution.

    Ammonia is real efficienct, but would not be a good way to go for mining.

    I would think some kind of brine would work fine, but like richard mentioned, I'm not sure freezing will be an issue.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hotlanta GA.
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    I just have to do this ..........

    14,000 feet of pipe, and I give it a good 14 inch diam. just for the gigle factor.

    pipe area = 154 sqr inch

    14,000 feet x 12 = 168,000 inch lenth

    168,000 x (A) 154 sq in. = 25,872,000 cb in.

    1 gal. = 231 cb in. so 112,000 gallons to fill said pipe.

    not only the presure at the bottom, but the weight of just the water =
    112,000 x (1 gal = 8.64 lbs.) so 483 tons of water, I let the pro's add the pipe weight to the thing !!

    keep in mind the pipe must hold the presure so just how thick would it be ??

    Can we say " I LOVE my above ground work " !!! The old HOT roof don't look so bad now !!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Austell, Ga.
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    Mongo...You got waaaaaay' too much time om yer' hands...Take my "Gen-3" tater gun using a sonic pulse valve with a 1000yd range firing a lime and see if you can pick off a squirrel or two...I have it in the back of my truck now..
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hotlanta GA.
    Posts
    214
    Richard ~~~ all I can say is "home land security !!!
    Will link up again, till then, keep it handy !!!

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