Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 19 of 19
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    River Forest IL
    Posts
    70

    Trane Voyagers

    Don't beat yourself up for not knowing how these work if you're just getting started in commercial work-none of us are born knowing this stuff. I like the fact that you are taking initiative to find answers-definitely the sign of a good tech. Anyone that thinks they've seen/know it all just hasn't been doing this long enough. Get used to not knowing-there are a million ways to do everything-even though ultimately we're trying to do the same things.

    Having said that, as klrogers said-get the books from Trane on their MicroControls and Ignition and Combustion-you might find them here or somewhere on the net, if not, you can get hardcopies (which I have, and tried to upload here for you-but wouldn't go through).

    The Voyager has 2 test terminals-literally called "Test 1" and "Test 2", on the main terminal strip. Take a jumper wire (or a pair of wire strippers/quarter-whatever), and jump out test 1/test2 for 2-3 seconds. Don't leave the jumper on-this test is sequential. The first test brings on the indoor fan. After you see the fan come on, jump out test1/test2 again-don't forget, jump it out for 2-3 seconds, then take the jumper off for 3-5 seconds. The next test is economizer. After that is cool 1-economizer close, then cool 2 -mechanical cooling, then heat 1, heat 2. When you use the test mode, bear in mind certain things are supposed to happen at given times.; When you get to the heat test, the combustion blower has to energize, all limits have to be closed, and the ignitor has to energize. If the combustion blower does not energize when it should-look to find out why...

    Our job is to figure out WHAT is supposed to happen WHEN-and WHY it's not. Hope this helps. Word to the wise-read everything you can get your hands on-when you know it-you own it!
    Will

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    california
    Posts
    223
    well I got fired after 3 weeks for dropping the ball and calling for help on this unit .The boss told me he now needs someone who can work on 50 ton units. When he knew I was coming from residential and very light commercial. First opportuinity to go commercial/industrial was unsuccessful. Never really was able to show him what I can do.

    My email is partyhatt07@gmail if anyone still has info on this unit. Still interested in the knowledge on this unit even though I am out of a job

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    3,082
    That really sucks. That is not a very good company if they just set you up for failure. You will find something better. I went from commercial to residential then back to commercial. I will never go back to resi if I can help it.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Join http://scopeny.org/ Shooter’s Committee on Political Education

    The world is full of sheep,try not to join the flock.

    Support the Skilled Trades, Don't DIY

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    River Forest IL
    Posts
    70

    Sorry to hear it-but...

    Doesn't sound like you were dealing with a very competent service manager to begin with. You came from a residential background, they hired you on board, then decided they needed someone to work on 50 ton units? (personally I think 50 tons is kind of small) A good service manager should be like a good First Sergeant- they've been down the road before, know what it's like in the field, know their people's strengths and weaknesses, and do whatever they can to support them/lead them down the right path. If you were cut off at the knees for looking for support, trust me-you wouldn't want to stay at that shop anyway. People like that make you hate going to work. Remember this-some people in positions of authority earned it-some people, well, let's just say...didn't.

    At this point, it's up to you whether or not you let a bad experience chase you away from the commercial end of things. There's more money and opportunities in commercial, but it comes with a cost to you-you can't stand still. I'm a qualified startup tech on McQuay Microtech II and III, Multistack, Turbocor compressors, Daikin systems, but so what? Any given day I'll run into stuff I've never seen before-if it was easy, the icecream man would be doing it. As long as I've been doing this, I still find myself reading manuals after work or at 3:30 in the morning-remember-when you know it-you own it.

    Keep your chin up-and keep at it-it'll pay off if you do.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    you know good & well that email addy doesn't belong in the post, that's what your profile is for
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Central New Jersey USA
    Posts
    65
    I feel for you. Always start with the easy stuff. Power Supply-OK. Control voltage-OK. Reboot-OK. Alway check the stupid plug connectors on a Trane. On the small Voyagers, there is always one near the fan section-they constantly have connection problems. The older stuff has the same OHM value on almost all of the sensors-(outdoor air-supply air etc..) check the sensors value against a good one. Always check the wires for loose or bad connections. Try to keep old test boards from old equipment in your truck. This helps to do a quick swap to see if you have any bad "triacs" in the UCP board.

    If that doesn't work, I can give you an old girl friends phone number. She could pull start anything.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event