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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    8

    best way to find a job in hvac

    hey everyone, I'm a 16 year old HVAC student attending a technical highschool in CT that offers a work based learning program. What would be the best way to find and secure a job in my trade? thankyou

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,029
    a secure job? there's not such thing boy. this is not the 1950s. even if you're good at what you do, have great customer base/PM plan, and the weather won't cooperate with you, it still be a slim time. if eqp not working nothing gonna break.
    Parts Changer Extraordinaire
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Have tools and gauges, will travel.

    RIDGID|YELLOW JACKET|UEI|TESTO|STANLEY|CPS|VETO| KLEIN|MILWAUKEE|MASTERCRAFT|

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sturbridge, MA
    Posts
    103
    stay in school till you graduate to start. Try to sell yourself out as a helper to a good company even if you do it for free. Maybe get a summer internship so you can learn out of school. Try not to screw up with the law too. I see alot of good techs sitting at home because they have a criminal record which is becoming more and more of an issue no matter what type of job you want.
    The best way to a secure job is to make sure your someone that can be trusted, works hard, knows his stuff, has a good attendence record (im 35 and just last year i had to prove to an employer that i had good attendence in high school), and has a good attitude. What you do and how you act now can follow you for the rest of your life.
    Also make sure you have decent driving record. Helps to actually be able to get to the calls.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    17
    I agree that staying in school is a good start.If your passionate about this trade you'll learn and doors will open eventually.Knowing a politician may help also.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by Achicagoperator View Post
    Knowing a politician may help also.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    19
    Do some research on hvac/r companies in your area. Create a resume, obviously you don't have much experience in anything , but put down any extra curricular activities or even why you are taking hvac courses. Go IN PERSON to apply to any jobs with your resume in hand. If no boss is there go back the next week, do not just give your resume to a secretary and hope for the best. Talk to the boss, in person!!

    Tell them exactly why you are applying for a company that specializes in what they do; "I have decided that I want to get into heating because of the amount of work with natural gas conversions and installs in the next 20 years." , "I'm hoping to get into commercial refrigeration because I want to work on large and technical systems."

    I'm assuming that you get school credit for working for an hvac company a couple weeks at a time(shop time?), make sure they know that. If a company shows any interest in you and says they will get back to you when they have more work; be annoying!!!! Call once a week and tell them you are just curious if they have enough work for you to work part time, you need to be the first person in their mind when looking for apprentices!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,213
    Quote Originally Posted by haleyann View Post
    hey everyone, I'm a 16 year old HVAC student attending a technical highschool in CT that offers a work based learning program. What would be the best way to find and secure a job in my trade? thankyou
    First, as noted, "secure" jobs were already disappearing when I was 16. Today, there is no such thing. More than 60% of doctors say this year that if they had to do it all over again, they would NOT go into medicine!!! We also have a glut of lawyers.

    Second, may I take it that "haleyann" indicates you are a young woman? This introduces a host of new variables into the mix. I tell you this frankly, because a school (which is a predominantly politically correct institution) will not tell you ALL of the facts.

    HVACR is "hard" work. It leaves men with good upper body strength tired. Are you athletic and toned? No? That alone should give you great pause, despite the rosy, "I am woman, hear me roar" BS that people push toward young folks.

    How have you scored on spatial relations tests? Ask your guidance counselor, as it should be in your record. You need to be in the 90th percentile or above.

    Regardless of gender issues, before entering any technical trade, you have to ask yourself, "does mechanical and electrical work seem to come naturally and comfortably to me?" In other words:

    1) were you the kid who was always taking things apart to find out how they worked?

    2) did you never miss an opportunity to ask questions about a device, system, or unit? In other words, mom or dad takes the car in for service. Do you ask "what does it mean when the check engine light comes on" or does it not enter your mind?

    These are the kind of things that should be a part of the life experience of a kid who will be happy in a technical trade. If you are NOT that kid, make another choice. NOW.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Woodbridge Twp, NJ
    Posts
    1,307
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    1) were you the kid who was always taking things apart to find out how they worked?
    .
    Funny you say that. I think back to when i was a kid and took apart old film projectors and tv's and clocks and stuff...then wasnt able to put them back together.

    I'm just glad i got into school and learned not only how to put things back together, but make it look like it was never taken apart in the first place.
    Every customer you take for granted today will be someone else's tomorrow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,213
    Yes, lol, the "putting it back together" often comes many years later.

    What I'm pointing out is the necessity of being that kid that has the thirst, that curiosity about "how stuff works." Without that, there is little hope for a successful career, because it is not "in your blood."
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    376
    Were you the kid who stuck a bobby pin in the wall outlet thinking you could "start the house" like mom & dad started the car?

    I did when I was 3. Little did I know then, instead of starting the house, that's when I started my career...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,213
    Quote Originally Posted by prorefco View Post
    Were you the kid who stuck a bobby pin in the wall outlet thinking you could "start the house" like mom & dad started the car?

    I did when I was 3. Little did I know then, instead of starting the house, that's when I started my career...

    That reminds me...

    I had an erector set when I was small. For our young guys here:

    an Erector set was a box of pressed steel parts that were meant to resemble steel girders, but they were flat, not I-beams. There ware also larger plates and accessories, sometimes formed into elaborate parts. They even had steel wheels, pulleys, shafts, etc. The deluxe set had an electric motor, with a reversible gearbox. You would put stuff together to make cranes, wagons, etc. There were a million little screws and nuts to do that. So, I had a screwdriver and a little wrench for the square nuts.

    My dad had a friend of his wire in an in-line switch to turn the motor on and off, instead of me pulling the plug out of the wall to stop the motor.

    One day, I got curious about how the switch worked. I think I was six.

    So, I got out my screwdriver and took the switch apart.

    I never thought to unplug the thing from the wall.

    I got it open, and saw the shiny copper stranded wire of the lamp cord used for the motor. I touched the wires. Luckily, I was not well grounded, but it was enough to teach me to not do that!!!!!
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,213
    The OP has not visited since Thursday evening. Interesting.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    376
    Gee, I hope he/she didn't try the bobby pin in the outlet trick...

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