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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4
    I would be very pleased if I could know, within the field of electrical fires, what would be your choice of location for your "perfect" fireplace for your home as a regular user:

    - Fireplace in internal corner
    - Inset fireplace
    - Hole-in-the wall fireplace
    - Other, which one?

    I am currently designing a new fireplace for my final project of a master course, and it is my first task investigate on current tastes of fireplaces.

    Thanks for your time


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8
    So I will give a guess

    Do you want an electric fireplace?

    What is the purpose of the fireplace do add warmth to the room? To fix an area that does not have enough heat, strictly for aesthetics. secondary heat source?

    What is the purpose of the fireplace

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4
    The purpose could be to provide warmth to the room (through electric supply) but it is strictly for aesthetics. From the aesthetic point of view, which is the place where you would locate your fireplace.

    In fact, I just have created a survey that could be easier to understand (and a little bit extended). If some of you have some minutes to spend on it, I will be very grateful.


    It is the link to it:
    http://FreeOnlineSurveys.com/renders...isz1wcb7200413

    Cheers


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,275

    Talking clarify terminology

    Nobody here wants electrical fires.

    If you want an electric fireplace, I suggest you surf the web( http://www.fireplaces.com ), do a little research, then go to your local hearth shop.
    As for Fp location, of course, it depends on the room. A Fp is the focal point of a room. It can make a statement about the owner's prosperity, tastes, hobbies, etc.

    Functionally, corners are goods for several reasons: what else are you going to put into a corner--some expensive goofy table? You can see the Fp from almost anywhere in the room. The Fp and better heat a room from a corner in most cases. Raising it on a platform makes it more visible but takes away space above that could house a TV for example.

    The electric Fps available have come a long way. You can get optional heat out of them as well. Plan on connecting it to a dedicated circuit that is well grounded (spelled licensed electrician).

    HTH

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for your suggestions

  6. #6

    Fireplace location

    Nothing says cozy like cuddling up in front of a roaring fireplace. As consumers, when we think of fireplaces, we sometimes tend to include marshmallows, a big fuzzy blanket, and maybe even champagne-- if the law permits itwith the persona of what a fireplace is.


    But in actuality, for most homeowners, having a fireplace will eventually become more than just a way to set a romantic moment. For those who have spent time as fireplace owners, they already know what the rest of the fireplace world is slowly learning: that having a fireplace in your home can be more than just for romance and relaxing evenings.


    With prices for energy constantly on the rise these days, many consumers are turning to fireplaces and their many variations as sources of inexpensive heat during the winter months. But ask any expert and they will tell you that plopping a fireplace in your living room is not the best way to save on energy with your heat bill. Instead, consumers should do extensive research on the types of fireplaces available and the best places in the home to put them.


    Dennis Capo works for Malm Fireplaces, which is just one of the many companies in the world that sells fireplaces in many different styles ranging from the traditional brick façade to the free standing gas fireplace that is operated by remote control. Capo says that if you are looking at putting a fireplace in a traditional area of the house in order to receive maximum heat, the main living room area is always the best bet. "Also, if you can get it closer to a hallway or corridor where the heat will travel into the other rooms it can help get heat throughout the house evenly," he adds.


    One thing that potential fireplace owners should be aware of before purchasing a fireplace for their home is the room where most of the time will be spent by the family. Now, if no one is the household spends a lengthy amount of time in the main living space, then putting a fireplace in that room can be a waste of time.


    Experts suggest that consumers study their living habits before rushing into any decision about a fireplace. Being able to correctly assess where the fireplace will best be suited in the home will help consumers save money upfront as well as in the long run.


    Having an idea of which room to put the fireplace in will also help homeowners know which type of fireplace will be best. For example, let's say that the homeowners spend most of their time working in a home office space. Now, it would probably be very expensive for a homeowner to rip out an office wall and install a traditional brick façade fireplace in the room. For one, the room may not be big enough to handle the construction and the cost could eventually get out of hand.


    So, experts suggest that consumers shop around and learn about the many different types of fireplaces that are available for different rooms and budgets. Some of the more popular fireplaces include free standing, gas, and electric.

    For more fireplace info:
    http://homegarden.expertvillage.com/...e-wood-gas.htm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,275

    Thumbs down cheese

    nice cut and paste jerseyguy. How about an original thought?

    Could have saved us the time with the link instead of copying the article with that fluff. Whoever wrote it doesn't sell hearth appliances or understand why people buy them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Lisle,Illinois
    Posts
    526

    Cool

    Hearthman,I always read and respect your posts,sounds like this thread did not.Lyle,"when in doubt,see if it can be used for fuel"
    Ethics are as important as education.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,275

    Smile ?

    Doc, not sure of your point or who Lyle is.

    If you feel I was harsh on Jerseyguy, well, maybe. I think if you are going to cut and paste someone else's material at least give them credit for it either by stating the reference or putting it in quotes. He did not make it clear his was a quote from the link posted. Also, it would help if jerseyguy put a little info. into his bio such as location and occupation.

    I still think the info. presented is not in touch with most hearth customers. Just my humble opinion. Example: "Now, if no one is the household spends a lengthy amount of time in the main living space, then putting a fireplace in that room can be a waste of time."

    Since when does the homeowner have to camp out in the family room to justify a Fp?

    Brick facade Fp in a home office? Where are they from??

    Doc, you too make good posts which I enjoy although I find you rather cryptic on this one.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,383
    Ummm. From the standpoint of economy, the obvious answer is to not install an electric fireplace at all. Electricity is an expensive fuel, and your central heating source is very likely to be more efficient at producing heat. So not installing a fireplace gives you lower cost heat and saves the cost of buying and maintaining a fireplace!




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