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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    148
    Are there any cons to having the "Hammer" version of s cordless drill? Does it sacrifice something, besides weight, to have that capability?

    Also, what are the disadvantages in general to a cordless hammer drill? I can easily see the advantages, and I also understand that the guts and power supply of a corded model are sometimes needed. But in general are they worth having?

    Finally, has anyone used the Dewalt XRP 18v, cordless drill/driver/hammer?

    Thanks Folks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Clearwater, Florida
    Posts
    233
    I bought the XRP hammer drill and it is now collecting dust. We do mostly new construction and it is a litte too heavy and cumbersome for shooting zip screws all day long. Most of the guys that I work with use 12volt Dewalts. The hammer drill may come in handy for some jobs, but not in what i bought it for. Hope this helps.
    Silence is golden - Duct Tape is Silver!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    PortChester N.Y.
    Posts
    135
    Ive got the Milwaukee V28, We use it for shooting screws and Mounting clamps to basement walls. One charge seems to last a whole day.Its a little heavier than the 18V, but man it sends a screw like nobody's business.

  4. #4
    I use one and other than the weight it's been an excellent tool.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,706
    i use the 18 xrp for holes in masonary all the time. to heavy for regular work though, use the 12 volt for sheet metal work.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    I have one... and since I hardly ever use the drill it works just fine for me... and saves me from having yet another tool taking up space in the van. For almost all screw I use my impact driver. The only thing that my dill does is drill holes.
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,035
    I do change outs....I uses the dewalt 18v XP every day puting in hurracane straps...so drill 4 holes per unit into concreate pads.and attaching line voltage whips to the wall...set on high speed it cranks.... but a little heavy to toss into the tool bag. I use a 14V Hitachi wifee poo pgot me as a gift after my 9.6v dewalt died....its lighter and works great as a large green cordless nut/screew driver.

    I got the 18V XP as part of the kit (sawz all...circular saw...light and drill)...this was given to me as a graduation present so not my choice....(I got to admit the 18V circular saw cuts through wood like a beaver on crystal meth)... I would look hard at the rigid line of tools...my 18V rigid came with a life time warrenty on everything includeing the batteries....and 18v bats cost $$$$.
    73% of Americans say that illegal immigration is a problem. The other 27% say, "No habla inglis!"

  8. #8
    i've used a 24v dewalt s type s hammer drill, different charger, and even that is heavy, just get ya a nice long cord and hammer away if power is needed(i.e. coring bits), or just use an 18v that holds a good charge, dewalts and Milwaukee come to mind.

  9. #9
    I've got both the 18 volt DeWalt and the 18 volt Milwaukee cordless hammer.

    For quick ocassional anchor setting, they are great.
    But if you need to set some serious anchors, get a serious tool. But a corded drill for the heavy work.


    If I had to drill a 1/2" anchor six inches down, in cement, away from 115 volt power ... I wouldnt hesitate to bring out the DeWalt cordless or the Milwaukee cordless.

    when it comes to drilling holes in cement, bigger tools do better work in shorter time. But bigger isnt always better, as you know.
    What's handy is often quite dandy...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    246
    Panasonic is the only way to fly. I have had the DeWalt and the battery charges just dont last as long as the panasonic.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    Originally posted by R12rules
    I've got both the 18 volt DeWalt and the 18 volt Milwaukee cordless hammer.

    For quick ocassional anchor setting, they are great.
    But if you need to set some serious anchors, get a serious tool. But a corded drill for the heavy work.


    If I had to drill a 1/2" anchor six inches down, in cement, away from 115 volt power ... I wouldnt hesitate to bring out the DeWalt cordless or the Milwaukee cordless.

    when it comes to drilling holes in cement, bigger tools do better work in shorter time. But bigger isnt always better, as you know.
    What's handy is often quite dandy...
    You would really like my Hilti 24v TE5-B!!That is one serious cordless hammer drill!
    Take your time & do it right!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Originally posted by markwolf
    What's handy is often quite dandy... [/B]
    You would really like my Hilti 24v TE5-B!!That is one serious cordless hammer drill! [/B][/QUOTE]

    Where I used to work they had a couple 36v (I think) cordless hilti's... them things were life savers. But spendy!!
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

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