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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    280

    Efficiency

    The Buderus is a little more efficient than the Biasi, in general. The Biasi B-10/3 has a lower firing rate than a G115WS/3, so there could be some savings. The B-10/4 has a higher stack temperature than the G 115/3 which will make it a little less efficient. Not clouding the waters all are great pieces of equipment. The real key is sizing the equipment to the load. Depending on the load I would use a B-10/3, then a G115WS/3, then a B-10/4, then a G115WS/4. Point is figure out what the real load on the equipment is.

    If the load is really 55,000BTU's a B-10/3 will work.
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  2. #15
    That's kind of where Im at right now. For giggles, I re-did my heat loss figures through a different program and it went from 55k to 68k. I should try another program and see where the #'s end up, but, if it's the case that the B10/3 is too small, then I have to consider a larger capactiy boiler, and the B10/4 is too big! Since Im a fan of the 3-pass design, I am also revisiting considering the G115/3 as the #'s are in the 'zone'.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    280

    G115WS/3

    I have the G115/3 in my house before the switch to the G115WS/3, it fires at a slightly lower rate than the WS (they're the same boiler). The manufacturer changed the firing rate, why? I don't know, but they work at the lower firing rate fine as long as the chimney can handle it (I think that why they changed the firing rate). Boilers can be "tweaked" firing rate wise by a good tech with a digital combustion analyzer.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Jurupa Valley, CA
    Posts
    1,654
    With those oil and electric prices, I'm wondering if oil is even worth the added complication. Might make more sense to go with an electric heat pump plus resistive electric back-up that will handle your heating and DHW loads. If resistive electric heat is only a little more expensive than 85% oil heat, then heat pump heat is going to be considerably cheaper except in the most extreme cold outdoor conditions (in which case, you'd be on the still not too expensive resistive heat).

  5. #18
    New heat loss calculation comes in at 86k BTU/hr.
    The Burnham MPO IQ 115 fits the bill - looks like the 84 is the same unit, but with a lower rated nozzle. Darn heavy, too!

    Question on the MPO - which burner option works best with it? Riello, NX or AFG? HOuse has a clay lined chimney.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    280

    Let me know

    Wish I could help, if you have a Buderus or Biasi question throw me a pitch. I prefer lighter boilers

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    God's country - Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Posts
    339

    Better Sharpen Your Pensil

    Quote Originally Posted by Kobe Diesel View Post
    New heat loss calculation comes in at 86k BTU/hr.
    .

    You calculated 55K earlier, now you say 86K? I'd re-check your figures carefully and see why they came out so far apart.

  8. #21
    I know, after having reviewed it, the floor losses were not factored in the orig. calculation.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,253
    Quote Originally Posted by Kobe Diesel View Post
    I know, after having reviewed it, the floor losses were not factored in the orig. calculation.
    Floor losses don't usually make up such a big amount. What values are you using?

  10. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by R Mannino View Post
    Wish I could help, if you have a Buderus or Biasi question throw me a pitch. I prefer lighter boilers
    Actually I do have one on the Biasi - the B10-4 used the have a net IBR of 84k BTU, called QHT and the tech said it's now 95k. Was it upfired for the same reason the G115 to WS was or for another reason? It's probably the same boiler, just tuned differently?

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,727
    Quote Originally Posted by bobboan View Post
    You calculated 55K earlier, now you say 86K? I'd re-check your figures carefully and see why they came out so far apart.

    Must be a 10,000 sq ft floor, or no insulation and its a vented crawlspace under the floor.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  12. #25
    basement is uninsulated, unheated, no crawl spaces. House has ~1800 heated living space, ranch, 2x6 framed with R19 batts as well as above the ceiling. im working the calcs again as we speak, but the program may not be as 'accurate'

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    280

    Heat Losses are almost always over rated

    We use the Beckett NX in the B-10/4 with a .65 nozzle @ 180psi which results in a .87GPH firing rate, sometimes I run it as low as 140psi which results in .77GPH. I would say different tuning, but the percentage of efficiency is not really combustion efficiency, but system (heat exchanger (boiler) efficiency). That is what most consumers have a hard time digesting. It's really the most efficient heat exchanger (and competent installer) that you can afford. The competent installer part is the most difficult to determine. Some would tell you that I'm not competent, but the 30-50% in energy dollars that you would save with me as your installer say otherwise.

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