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  1. #1

    "Emergency" replacement motor for Armstrong 95% furnace model G2D95AU?

    Hi -

    We recently bought a 20 year old home with two 11ish year old Armstrong 95% furnaces models G2D95AU. Just before closing, along with invoices for a bunch of repairs from the inspection, the previous owners included a bill from their HVAC contractor. It seems they had a service call on one of the units not blowing any cold air. Tech determined blower was shot and replaced it with what they called an "emergency" or "rescue" motor.

    I wondered a bit when I saw this, so I called the contractor to ask if this replacement would allow the unit to operate as it should. Whoever I talked to explained that it was just a generic motor rather than an OEM and the unit would operate just fine.

    After living here for a month and noticing the blower fan is really noisy compared to the Westinghouse 95% we had at previous house, I decided to read the furnace owner's manual and look at the furnace. Seems the replacement motor is wired just to the "CIRC" hot and "CIRC" neutral terminals. It also has a capacitor sort of black taped to the wiring harness that doesn't look factory installed.

    So, I guess what they did was to effectively change the blower from a variable speed unit to a single speed? Will this work very well when we get to heating season - according to manual this is a 2 stage unit that should have a low and high blower speed that depends on the fire level? And maybe a higher speed for cooling?

    Bottom line, do I have a mess on my hands?

    Thanks for any light you can cast...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    7,048
    I believe that unit should have a variable speed ECM motor. Not a psc motor as you described. It will work but is not the correct motor for that furnace

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,179
    Are they coming back with the variable speed motor that belongs in there? What they put in should he just temporary.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060
    Quote Originally Posted by tj__r View Post
    Hi -

    We recently bought a 20 year old home with two 11ish year old Armstrong 95% furnaces models G2D95AU. Just before closing, along with invoices for a bunch of repairs from the inspection, the previous owners included a bill from their HVAC contractor. It seems they had a service call on one of the units not blowing any cold air. Tech determined blower was shot and replaced it with what they called an "emergency" or "rescue" motor.

    I wondered a bit when I saw this, so I called the contractor to ask if this replacement would allow the unit to operate as it should. Whoever I talked to explained that it was just a generic motor rather than an OEM and the unit would operate just fine.

    After living here for a month and noticing the blower fan is really noisy compared to the Westinghouse 95% we had at previous house, I decided to read the furnace owner's manual and look at the furnace. Seems the replacement motor is wired just to the "CIRC" hot and "CIRC" neutral terminals. It also has a capacitor sort of black taped to the wiring harness that doesn't look factory installed.

    So, I guess what they did was to effectively change the blower from a variable speed unit to a single speed? Will this work very well when we get to heating season - according to manual this is a 2 stage unit that should have a low and high blower speed that depends on the fire level? And maybe a higher speed for cooling?

    Bottom line, do I have a mess on my hands?

    Thanks for any light you can cast...
    Have them come back and replace the motor with the correct one. The home inspector should have found this when he inspected the house. If the home owner had the receipt then they where aware of the temporary repair. Contact the real-estate agent and make them aware of what you found and have it remedied.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by second opinion View Post
    The home inspector should have found this when he inspected the house. If the home owner had the receipt then they where aware of the temporary repair.
    This all occurred a couple days after the inspection. On the one hand, I give the sellers some credit for trying to fix it rather than cover it up. But I will contact our realtor as a first step towards getting this squared away.

    Thanks to all three of you who replied.

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    1,439
    Just a side note I've not ever seen a home inspector check for the correct blower motor. The home owners may be under the assumption that it was fixed permanently and correctly. The variable speed motor will be much more expensive to replace then the rescue motor that was installed. Just a heads up.

    Sent from my ERIS using Tapatalk 2

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jdblack View Post
    The home owners may be under the assumption that it was fixed permanently and correctly.
    Here's what it says on the Customer Comments and Concerns section of the repair order: "house is sold, do minimum". It's hard to say what her understanding of that was at the time. What does irk me is that when I called the contractor to ask whether it was a proper replacement, they told me that it was - never said anything about it being a temporary fix. I suspect they were more interested in retaining the sellers as customers (they moved to a new house nearby) than in being straight with me.

    It also looks like the blower control board is missing from its normal spot, guess it wasn't needed with the replacement motor.

    We'll see what can be done. And jdblack, I get what you say about inspectors - they seem to just turn on the thermostat and check for hot and cold coming out. Considering the number of different mechanicals in a home like this, that's about all they can do in the time they have.

    Thanks again for the help.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by tj__r View Post
    And jdblack, I get what you say about inspectors - they seem to just turn on the thermostat and check for hot and cold coming out. Considering the number of different mechanicals in a home like this, that's about all they can do in the time they have.
    Depending on the state and/or local licensing laws, that may be all the home inspector is legally allowed to do.

    In Texas, unless the inspector also has an HVAC contractors license, all they can do is look at what can be seen without removing any panels from the unit, and measure the air temperatures at the registers.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    A new blower control board and ECM motor probably cost more to replace than the whole furnace did brand new.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    81
    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

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    Last edited by jpsmith1cm; 08-28-2012 at 08:40 PM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by martyinlincoln View Post
    A new blower control board and ECM motor probably cost more to replace than the whole furnace did brand new.
    I suspect that's about right - especially if there's another 30% tax credit coming. So, if we can't get any satisfaction we may just wait until we round up the money to replace it, especially since everything else is 11 years old, even though it'll be a crappy runner this winter. We may wind up using the other bigger downstairs-zoned unit more for heating anyway since I suspect the 2nd floor will stay plenty warm on its own. I really liked the way our Westinghouse/Nordyne worked in the old house - quiet, comfortable, not drafty.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,665
    You better hang on to your hat when they give you the price to replace that motor and module .although at 11 years the furnace should have alot of life left

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,025
    I just replaced one of those last month.
    The replacement motor comes with a new module, CFM/timer board, and all new wiring on the blower side.
    COMPLETE re-wiring of the everything in the blower section.
    Not a cheap or simple repair.
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

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