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Thread: no experience

  1. #1
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    no experience

    I am considering attending a training class either by one of the mfgs or by this place entech. I do not work on many chillers now and if I do only some small air cooled ones. Does anybody have some reccomendatioms for me on where to go . What I am hoping for is that after I do this i can get hired on by a contractor that works on centrifugals/screws the large tonnage systems. This has been my career goal since I started in the trade. If I'm going about this wrong let me know. I would consider moving if it would get me to my goal. I'm a hands on learner and don't do well with books. Even ashort story on how some of you guys got to where you are at now would be great. As I said this is my dream just not sure how to get there

  2. #2
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    Attending a training class held by one of the manufacturers wouldn't qualify you to work on centrifugals by any stretch of the imagination.

    Entech does have excellent training from what I've been told.

    One of the worrisome things you stated is that you don't do well with books. That, to me, is a problem. Books hold many of the keys to being successful as a mechanic of any kind. I've been in this trade for 37 years and I still pick up books to either further my education or refresh me on something I haven't seen in awhile. In this day I believe a top notch centrifugal mechanic has to be proficient in math and physics, know electronics, be computer savvy, understand systems (not just the chiller) and being willing to spend the time to hit the books to further his understanding.

    My suggestion is to get hired in a company that does both heavy commercial/industrial service as well as light commercial. Work your butt off and ask to be exposed to the centrifugals. Enroll in any local college or trade school classes you can. I'm sorry, but when a typical manual for a control panel is 180 pages, I can't see how you would be able to survive without knowing that book. My money says you'd never be exposed to all situations on the job.

  3. #3
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    Dont get in a big hurry, understand the smaller stuff first. Once you are proficient on those systems then move on to something a little bigger etc. etc. etc.

  4. #4
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    i know many people that have attended a chiller class and then couldn't point one out in a room. don't get me wrong, chiller classes are great but having a class on your resume won't get you hired on to work on chillers. find a company that already is working on the chillers and work your way up.

    you need to learn to read.

    engineers come up with some crazy **** and you need to be able to see where they went wrong, where the installing contractor messed up the install and how to fix it...basically, you need to be an engineer. you won't learn it by tearing apart a chiller or going to 1 or 2 classes.

    i commend you on having a goal and setting out a game plan to get there...this will probably take you farther than anything, but like KY said, you have to keep learning by reading.
    You either love bacon or you are wrong.

    4 gallons of gas, 2 miles of travel, teaching my daughters how to drive in the high school parking lot...priceless!

  5. #5
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    engineers come up with some crazy **** and you need to be able to see where they went wrong, where the installing contractor messed up the install and how to fix it...basically, you need to be an engineer. you won't learn it by tearing apart a chiller or going to 1 or 2 classes.



    Never thought of it that way, the find where the engineer or install went wrong,
    but yes ur right .,
    the goal is to be a great one., books a must., and lots of puddings and such.,
    but the real goal is to save energy and make every thing as efficient and work friendly as possible ., oh , and what Jay said!

    Classes can be pricey, get on with a company and learn.,
    U a young N? If so , all u got is time, if not , all you got is time., good luck w ur adventure
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  6. #6
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    Like the others have stated, time is needed. Concentrate on the refrigeration system first. There is no difference between a 3 ton and 2000 ton machine. The system is the same "Vapor Compression"; just bigger, more safeties and controls, and more money. Just try not to be overwhelmed with everthing and listen to your elders. Do not waste your money on a class yet, you will not get much out of it at this time. Work on chillers as an apprentice for awhile and go to a class after about 3 years of working with them.

    Try your local Union hall as well, most offer classes and will have mentors there as well.

  7. #7
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    You're going to have to find a company that works on chillers and rooftop units for you to prove yourself, then ask to be exposed to the big tonnage stuff. If you are like me, you will have to read a lot of books before you can even hold a conversation about chillers where people don't look at you like you're some kind of window-licking mong. Most of the customers who have been around experienced mechanics can sniff out a rookie in seconds.

    Hang around HVAC-Talk and DEFINITELY get your pro membership as soon as possible! There are at least 20-30 walking encyclopedias on the subject who are happy to share their experience and post regularly here. Pay attention to them. I also can't stress the importance of the SYSTEM enough. You need to understand fluid flow on the molecular level, along with all of the pumps and fans that move the fluids.
    Last edited by Tech Rob; 04-16-2012 at 09:33 PM.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayguy View Post

    engineers come up with some crazy **** and you need to be able to see where they went wrong, .
    Jay how could you .........engineers are NEVER wrong !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    The 64 roars to life Whoo hoo ...shes a rolling chassis .
    You bend em" I"ll mend em" !!!!!!!
    I"m not a service tech.. I"m a thermodynamic transfer analyst & strategic system sustainability specialist
    Best Austin Healey In Show twice in 2013 .....All those hrs paid off .

  9. #9
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    I tottaly agree guys. I should not have said I don't do well with books and not elaborated. I can learn a massive amount from them and I do. What I was trying to say is there are some things that you just can't learn out of a book. I am currently at a commercial company and work on roof top units and mostly refrigeration. But there is something about crawling around on restauant floors and such that makes me think this is not my dream job. I have tried to get a job with some of the more industrial companies and they don't wanna take on a chiller apprentice. They are looking for guys like knew york with 37 years centrifugal experience. Can you guys reccomend any good books to me. I'm just a guy looking for the oppertunity to learn and don't know where to start.

  10. #10
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    What's your location?
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  11. #11
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    Southwest florida

  12. #12
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    Put an e-mail address in your profile. I will fill you in on some things off the radar.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavalieri85 View Post
    ...I'm just a guy looking for the oppertunity to learn and don't know where to start.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    Put an e-mail address in your profile. I will fill you in on some things off the radar.
    and some people wonder 'what is so great about this site'...this is why.

    the right people with the right attitude can go very far.
    You either love bacon or you are wrong.

    4 gallons of gas, 2 miles of travel, teaching my daughters how to drive in the high school parking lot...priceless!

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