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Thread: Filter drier

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Arkansas
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    835
    Bryant recommends installing them at the evaporator coil.

    The instructions state "Installation of filter drier in liquid line is required"

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    5,513
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    On a new installation I don't even use a filter drier. But I purge with nitrogen while soldering, ream all connections, and keep tubing clean. This along with a good vacuum, why is it necessary? Just some added pressure drop in my opinion.
    A small pressure drop in the LL doesn't affect performance. Systems using POE oil REQUIRE a filter drier.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alabama
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    378
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    A small pressure drop in the LL doesn't affect performance. Systems using POE oil REQUIRE a filter drier.
    As I said, I am accustomed to R22 units, havnt had much dealings with 410a so a lot of times I read something here and my mind is thinking in terms of R22. I do realize the importance of a drier in a 410a unit.
    II Chronicles 7:14 Galatians 2:20 Ephesians 2:8-9

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    759
    what is the difference between 410a and 22 as far as the filter drier goes I forget. i guess the poe oil absorbs the moisture.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
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    9,548
    By the metering device is best....period. Yes I've replaced many on the LL by the condenser, not my installs. This is why a nitrogen flow while brazing is important....prevents the copper from forming the black carbon while combined with oxygen, and blocking the txv's screen or orifice. On the new systems with it already installed, a nitrogen flow while brazing works great I've found. No issues.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvac17011 View Post
    what is the difference between 410a and 22 as far as the filter drier goes I forget. i guess the poe oil absorbs the moisture.
    410a creates acid alot quicker the R-22 when moisture is in the system, because of the oil used. But a monkey can install a system and it will last a year usually, out of warranty. Not what my company believes in.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    heatingman said it correctly IMO, at least how I was taught.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    3,854
    install them at the indoor metering device. if it is a heatpump system i also install at indoor unit and start the unit in COOLING mode for 10 minutes to allow the filter drier to catch any left over debris. the reasons why i install them inside are; prevents rust and leaks on drier, catches the junk before it enters TXV screen. also a sight glass after the filter drier is a good idea. i also purge with nitrogen while brazing. if you have been in the trade long enough, you will hear of the service calls that "the txv is bad its only a year old" these jobs usually have the drier at the outdoor unit and no nitrogen was purged when brazing. 9 times out of 10 the txv is clogged and/or the filter drier is clogged but the diagnosis is still a bad TXV

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alabama
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    658
    Driers have been installed outside for many, many years. Why change now??? Yeah, it seems logical to install it at the MD, but you are creating extra work of climbing in an attic when it's 105+ outside. (140 plus in attic)

    If you guys change a compressor, do you climb in a scalding hot attic to see if there's a drier?? I don't.

    TXV's go bad when trash gets in them, true! But 90% or so go bad cause of mass production and cheap manufacturing.

    Do us all a favor and put the driers outside... After all, what can break loose in the LL to stop up a drier anyway?
    You're only as good as your customer will allow you to be.........If they want junk, sell them junk, but make your junk look neat!!!

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alabama
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    378
    Quote Originally Posted by superd77 View Post
    Driers have been installed outside for many, many years. Why change now??? Yeah, it seems logical to install it at the MD, but you are creating extra work of climbing in an attic when it's 105+ outside. (140 plus in attic)

    If you guys change a compressor, do you climb in a scalding hot attic to see if there's a drier?? I don't.

    TXV's go bad when trash gets in them, true! But 90% or so go bad cause of mass production and cheap manufacturing.

    Do us all a favor and put the driers outside... After all, what can break loose in the LL to stop up a drier anyway?
    I am inclined to agree with this position especially if the AH is in the attic. The temps will be far greater up there than outside. Plus what percentage of techs will go in the attic to check if there has been a drier installed up there when they have to open a system for some reason? I don't think that number would be high. So do you then end up with 2 driers for the same system? I have seen it happen.

    There are usually only 2 joints between the cu and the ah downstream from the drier if speaking in terms of resi units, one at the drier, one at the ah. I understand the need for close to the ah but I think some logic should be used depending on the application. JMHO
    II Chronicles 7:14 Galatians 2:20 Ephesians 2:8-9

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Greenwood Indiana (Indianapolis)
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    420

    Cool

    Back in the early 80's, the drier came loose like a lot of units do now. But installers wouldn't put them on, would "save them for my side jobs", so manufactures started putting them inside the outdoor unit. Is this the best place for it, probably not but its better than not having one at all. I like them outside for serviceability. I know in Florida they rust out from the salty air, but here they don't rust out. Well I have seen some partially on the ground and 25 years old rust through. If the compressor goes bad and needs replaced and the drier is inside, a lot, not all, techs put one outside, now the unit has 2.
    As iron sharpens iron so one man sharpens another Proverbs 27:17 NIV84

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    835
    The Bryant R-22 cond. units used to come with a copper molecular sieve drier. Never used them, but would use a 083S or an 163S instead.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    139
    Not to jack the thread but are there differences in quality of dryers between manufactures? Is it something a homeowner needs to be concerned with if having a dryer replaced?

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