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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    24

    Looking to work Internationally from Canada

    I was looking around the internet on jobs in the San Diego/California area and wondering if anyone has any experience on the industry in this area. There seems to be a lot of jobs in the SD area. I am from Canada with a journeyman red seal and gas fitting level 2.

    I would like to try getting a visa and working in the USA for another experience.
    Has anyone done this? Anyone from this area with advice? Is it hard to gain employment at this time?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    brooklyn ny
    Posts
    103
    you have to get an employ to get visa for working in the good old usa talk to the canada embassy they will have all info for you not a bad idea to come and work in this part of northamerica sandiego/colifornia great for any body wanting experience in this industry goog luck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    63
    Hard to do. You can get a US visa and residency if your wife is a citizen, or if a company will apply for a visa for you. You're welcome to visit but its difficult to get residency. US Citizens have first priority for jobs.Can take a long time to get everything done, years.
    If you are working for a US company in another country its easier.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    brooklyn ny
    Posts
    103
    there is alway a way when one door is shut another is open pass over is coming soon take heel.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    24
    I figured citizens would have the 1st priority, I have been seeing a ton of job openings online. You hear a lot of nasty stuff about both economies lately but I don't believe half of it. If I would be planning to work it would just be temporary so I think you would need a H1-B visa for skilled/professional work.

    Just visited California lately and we both loved it, so why not try and live the dream for a little while.

    Thanks for any info.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    655
    Have a run over to http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis and click on "temporary nonimmigrant workers" and you'll come up with a lot of information. It is however unlikely that you'll be accepted unless you can get an employer to submit the necessary forms, plus prove to USCIS that you are more qualified than a local. However, if you or your spouse have an advanced degree (beyond baccalaureate) from an "accredited" educational institution then you have increased your chances by a large margin. Similarly, if you have served in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces, you are nearly automatically granted residency...

    Of course, if you are going to start a business and employ people, then you also improve your chances (mightily)...

    The economic situation in the USA is improving, but not to the state where they are actively recruiting for foreign skilled trades workers, unlike the situation at the Alberta oil sands projects...

    And always remember, just like people trying to come to Canada, NEVER deal with any "consultants" or such, only deal with USCIS...

    Hope this gives you some food for thought...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    63
    Took me 4 years to get it finalized, even with my wife a US Citizen. Medical checkups, shots for chicken pox, $$ forms without end, wait wait wait. Can't really say I would do it again. Economy is worse than Canada now, unemployment is over 10%. California, San Diego may be great, but Democrats are determined to drive all business out of state to Texas. Taxes, fees worse than Morontario. California expected to be first state to declare bankruptcy. Depends on next election. Don't take my word for it , look it up.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    24
    Awesome information guys, thanks a bunch, at the end of the day it's what we feel like pursuing. Nothing will be like the Alberta oilsands but it has its ups and downs as well. HVAC seems to be a stong industry no matter where you are, and will only get better with time and shortages.

    Either way Cali looks like an incredible place to spend a year or so.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    655
    Quote Originally Posted by ivandykeman View Post
    Awesome information guys, thanks a bunch, at the end of the day it's what we feel like pursuing. Nothing will be like the Alberta oilsands but it has its ups and downs as well. HVAC seems to be a stong industry no matter where you are, and will only get better with time and shortages.

    Either way Cali looks like an incredible place to spend a year or so.
    Well, if you have got a NAIT or SAIT diploma plus a Red Seal, you may just outdo our "cousins" in terms of qualifications, so why not try?...

    Just some old fart... "Who doesn't know anything"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Canmore, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    24
    haha well i wasn't going to head down that road but i feel confident in my training from Canada's apprenticeship program. Depends on the state and the technician, some of the guys have a lot of equipment specific training. Also McQuay has one of their head training facilities in San Deigo.

    Sincerely,

    Some young guy who knows just enough to get in trouble.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    100
    H1-B visas are really hard to get, basically you have to prove to U.S. Customs that nobody within the U.S has the same qualifications as you.....if you find a company to sponsor you, you will need to qualify under the NAFTA approved listed professions, and then you can only apply for a TN visa which is only good for 1 year intervals...I have read allot of stories where Canadians working in the U.S under TN visas can be easily denied renewal, especially if the customs agent believes your intentions is to permanently move there. Until the U.S immigration adds "Technical Trades" to the list of approved professions under NAFTA it will be difficult.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,223
    Not sure what red seal and gas level 2 mean. Construction in San Diego hasn't recovered to pre-recession numbers. Local 230 is the union here. You might give a call and see how many members are sitting on the bench. Our company might be around 120 or more when things are going well. Right now we are less than 90. Being a centrifugal mechanic might change things.

    Not sure about the cost of living is where you are...it's pretty high here.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    bedford ind
    Posts
    1,092
    too bad you aren't crossing the mexican border. Cali would pay your way, room, board and education. and you wouldn't need a drivers license

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