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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    8
    How many CFM does a typical residential clothes dryer pull from a room?

  2. #2
    First select the best description of the unit,

    1.Fat
    2.Skinny
    3.Ugly
    4.Pretty
    5.Tall
    6.Short
    7.Deep
    8.Shallow

    Nobody can tell the cfm without more infomation,
    look on the blower motor, fan or manual.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    BTU's ,please.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    Dryer airflow

    If it is like my gas dryer, it appears to be about a hundred CFM. It exits air through a 4-inch vent, in the absence of any measuring equipment you might estimate based on air speed of 600-1000 feet/min. Do you need anything more precise?

    It might be interesting to know why you ask.

    -- Pstu

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Most are 120 to 150 cfms ,IF the 4" vent is not too long,restricted ,or has too many elbows.

    They are designed for a maximum od 25' of duct,with each 90 elbow counted as 5' of duct.Now I have heard some newe ones are designed for longer vent duct ,but i haven't seen that in print yet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    for duct runs over 5ft, use an inverted reducer to 6inch smoke grade pipe & ells, then reduce back down to get standard dryer thru- the- wall fitting = lo back pressure!

    -- like mine = 3 turns ~30ft = NO lint collection at last ell before exiting, flap stands straight out when dryer is run -- but only for 4y, now. ps, I applied fiberglass wrap to keep gar cooler in summer -- just dump air in winter.

    make it big, bury it deep!

    are you trying to supply makeup air for
    combustion?
    ventilation?
    or, just get rid of hot air?
    [sometimes, lots of that around]

    [Edited by cem-bsee on 06-01-2006 at 07:21 PM]
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    8
    Sorry, I should have made it clear that I didn't need specifics. I was guessing about 150 cfm.

    I was just wondering because it's in our basement in a room that doesn't see much circulation.

  8. #8
    You may want to consider a ventless clothes dryer. Instead of venting the moisture, a compressor-based heat pump (operating as a dehumidifier) extracts it and recycles a lot of the heat. As a result, it costs less to operate and puts less load on your A/C.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by star882
    You may want to consider a ventless clothes dryer. Instead of venting the moisture, a compressor-based heat pump (operating as a dehumidifier) extracts it and recycles a lot of the heat. As a result, it costs less to operate and puts less load on your A/C.
    Do you have a link for that product??

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    Originally posted by dash
    Originally posted by star882
    You may want to consider a ventless clothes dryer. Instead of venting the moisture, a compressor-based heat pump (operating as a dehumidifier) extracts it and recycles a lot of the heat. As a result, it costs less to operate and puts less load on your A/C.
    Do you have a link for that product??
    Seen one like that in popular mechanics about 10 years ago. Need to blow that lint outside though.

    Typical clothes dryer about 160 to 200 CFM

  11. #11
    Originally posted by dash
    Originally posted by star882
    You may want to consider a ventless clothes dryer. Instead of venting the moisture, a compressor-based heat pump (operating as a dehumidifier) extracts it and recycles a lot of the heat. As a result, it costs less to operate and puts less load on your A/C.
    Do you have a link for that product??
    http://us.lge.com/products/model/det...WM3677HW.jhtml
    That's the one I have. Beware that it uses a rotary compressor (based on the sound) and is pretty noisy on the dry cycle. (However, it's not as noisy as the spin cycle.)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,305

    LONG CYCLE

    On that type of dryer, it takes a VERY long time to dry. We got a memo to give heads up to customer, that it may take about 2-3 hours to do a load!

  13. #13

    Re: LONG CYCLE

    Originally posted by mayguy
    On that type of dryer, it takes a VERY long time to dry. We got a memo to give heads up to customer, that it may take about 2-3 hours to do a load!
    That's due to the lower temperatures and the need to clean the coils. The condenser doesn't get as hot as the heater in a regular clothes dryer, and every once in a while (based on high side pressure I believe), the compressor stops and the automatic coil cleaner turns on (the lint is washed off and leaves with the drain water). I question the reliability of the compressor a little (as it operates at temperatures and pressures higher than the ones in A/Cs), but it's specially designed for this application and I have not heard a single failure report. Only time will tell how long the compressor will last.

    Nonetheless, for those who do laundry frequently, the energy savings can easily offset the higher price of the unit. The lower temperatures are also gentler on clothing. And best of all, no need to move clothing from the washer to the dryer!

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