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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    975

    How much of our trade should go to videos on Youtube ?

    I know it's accepted and I also have learned a few things or short cuts that are fairly well thought out I had not thought of. My point is why give away our trade procedures to the whole free world on a platform like Youtube?

    I'm know it gains business for a lot of you that have companies and manufacturing of products.

    I sorta have a problem letting the public watch the deep end of the swimming pool technically as in procedures and then buying the tools and get the equipment online even if warranty is out the window etc.

    Just saying or asking when is it too far ????

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,149
    Good or Bad, its past the point of no return now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    975
    Agreed, it's too far gone off the deep end now I guess !!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,220
    Most people will not invest the time and money for something they might only do once every 5, 10 or 20 years. Not to mention the fear factor. I'm not too worried about it. You can even count on some business when they screw it up.

    Watch those videos closely and you will realize there is a lot of basic info missing. You can't possibly cram all that we do out of habit into a 10 minute "everybody look how handy I am, my father was wrong about me" video.
    "...and pray it works, pray to God it works."

    ---Nick's Handyman

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rySKAuk4XiM

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,907
    These videos have two consequences.

    1) They lead people into believing that they can perform procedures that expose them to a great level of serious injury or death.

    2) The self-made "stars" of these videos do nothing to portray the trade as professionals who are worthy of respect by the consumer.

    What we need is to be able to host videos for US, in a way that cannot be accessed by others who are not Pros here on this site.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,149
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    These videos have two consequences.

    1) They lead people into believing that they can perform procedures that expose them to a great level of serious injury or death.

    2) The self-made "stars" of these videos do nothing to portray the trade as professionals who are worthy of respect by the consumer.

    What we need is to be able to host videos for US, in a way that cannot be accessed by others who are not Pros here on this site.
    That would be a nice addition here.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    192
    X2 it would be a great addition here
    Do it once. Do it correct.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    1,942
    How much of our trade should go to videos on Youtube ?

    Enough to train all the Mexicans and recent arrivals from Central America. This is an honest question. Do ya'll think you will escape the same fate that brick layers, carpenters, electricians, plumbers, foundation pourers, & roofers have had here in the state of Texas?
    The historical record is clear. Nations rise on economic nationalism. They descend on free trade. - Patrick J. Buchanan Suicide of a Superpower.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by exreo View Post
    How much of our trade should go to videos on Youtube ?

    Enough to train all the Mexicans and recent arrivals from Central America. This is an honest question. Do ya'll think you will escape the same fate that brick layers, carpenters, electricians, plumbers, foundation pourers, & roofers have had here in the state of Texas?
    I have spent almost 30 years in this trade, the youtube videos, powerpoints, pdf files, and what ever you might find on the web doesn't replace the basic knowlege that one has to have to understand how this trade works. Sure you might find that video to replace a part, wire up a thermostat, and you might also find a video how to install your garbage disposal, but the install on your garbage disposal won't tell you how that motor works. I have seen DIY peeps do everything right up to start up but have to call the expert in to do a proper startup. Around these parts we had a influx of Russians and Ukranians flood the trades, after this economy, the only ones that survived were the ones that new how things worked. They were not guys that did not know the trade. Working at a shop for three years does not make an expert.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,335
    it's when they forget important steps that bother me and there are a lot of videos out there. I consider it misinformation and will always comment about it so someone doesn't use that video. there is one guy in particular that is horrible. they all think they are doing good and some do make nice informative videos. personally it's not my thing but I would enjoy seeing it here.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    63
    I think your fears are unfounded. First, the supply houses in general are locking down who they sell to. In my area you must be employed as an HVAC tech working for an established company to buy from them. There is even a sign on the door stating no sales to the public.

    Second, the Youtube videos really aren't organized. Yes, there is a lot of information on there, and it might cut into business a small percentage, but not nearly as much as you think.

    Most people aren't like me, or the hardcore DIY'er. They won't bother to read/view videos just to learn. They want a quick fix.

    I have no idea what things typically break on HVAC units. I would assume caps, contactors, and condenser fans are the biggest "easy" repairs a homeowner can do (safely/legally). Above that a company must be called. That is where the money is as well. I can't evacuate, replace a compressor, and recharge. You guys have a regulatory advantage that throws up a barrier to entry. Also in my area one can repair the equipment themselves but a permit must be pulled by a licensed contractor to replace the units. This is good in a way because it (hopefully) protects future home owners from DIY installs.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,422
    DIYers aren't a threat, they're job security because messing with a refrigeration cycle is a more complex than replacing a toilet flange and most are bound to screw something up and call us to fix it. How many of you pros would call a plumber, electrician etc to come fix something at your house? I know I wouldn't, I'm the most avid DIYer I know.

    My neighbor bought a goodman heat pump and air handler online 2 years ago and installed it himself. He thought he'd save money. He asked me to come check it because it was making a funny noise. I guaged up and head was hunting from 350-500psig, he didn't pull a vacuum when he installed it so it's got noncondensables in it. He asked how much I would charge to fix it, I told him and he said that's not much less than what he paid for the equipment. He opted to just let it run like that instead of fixing it. I'd be surprised if it lasts through the year without giving up the ghost.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,907
    Quote Originally Posted by pipsters View Post
    I think your fears are unfounded. First, the supply houses in general are locking down who they sell to. In my area you must be employed as an HVAC tech working for an established company to buy from them. There is even a sign on the door stating no sales to the public.

    Second, the Youtube videos really aren't organized. Yes, there is a lot of information on there, and it might cut into business a small percentage, but not nearly as much as you think.

    Most people aren't like me, or the hardcore DIY'er. They won't bother to read/view videos just to learn. They want a quick fix.

    I have no idea what things typically break on HVAC units. I would assume caps, contactors, and condenser fans are the biggest "easy" repairs a homeowner can do (safely/legally). Above that a company must be called. That is where the money is as well. I can't evacuate, replace a compressor, and recharge. You guys have a regulatory advantage that throws up a barrier to entry. Also in my area one can repair the equipment themselves but a permit must be pulled by a licensed contractor to replace the units. This is good in a way because it (hopefully) protects future home owners from DIY installs.

    As far as I am concerned, you can diy as much as you like. I do commercial work, so it's no skin off my back. If you want to take a chance at harming yourself or your family, you are welcome to do so.

    That said, we won't help you hurt yourself or others, and speaking for myself, I won't join in with the yahoos that make the trade appear to be as skilled as a road kill collector.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







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