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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,035

    Confused

    Why are impact drivers so popular???

    I've been reading some of the old power tool post...lots of post recommending IMPACT drivers...and I really don't understand why......the ones I read said they cant be used for drilling holes...ok...and doing change out I don't drive or remove that many screws...a few into cans to hold a new grill or to take a unit apart to fit in an attic....nothing that big and even old rusted 5/16 screws on a unit are not that hard to get out. I use a air impact driver when working on the car so know what they are...

    So I feel like I'm missing something....failing to comprehend....could you all please explain it to me.
    73% of Americans say that illegal immigration is a problem. The other 27% say, "No habla inglis!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Richmond Virginia
    Posts
    1,078
    They're for the "big dogs". For centrifugals, screws, and large semi's. Lots of bolts.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    we use these alot. there is nothing faster for shooting screws into metal that is cordless. nice and light and POWERFUL. they spin at 2300rpm that is about as fast as a drywall gun. they make a 3/8" chuck for it too.
    http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...&tag=BTD120SAE

    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  4. #4
    Originally posted by seaboard
    They're for the "big dogs". For centrifugals, screws, and large semi's. Lots of bolts.
    No, they are for any service tech or installer.

    They are faster, lighter, smaller, and they remove the wrist stress... as they impact when the fastener becomes tight.

    They aid in removing rusted or tuff bolts and screws.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    Nothing can match them for putting screws in.

    Ever have a drill catch and snap your wrist around when putting in a screw? Won't happen with an impact driver. Granted they aren't the one tool fits all, more of a specialty tool.

    Be sure to pick up an adapter from the hex to square drive. They work awesome for removing or putting in smallish bolts (I've done up to 1/2" bolts before, just needed a little tug of a wrench to tighten it up).
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902

    Why are impact drivers so popular???

    Because they make a impact

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    4,917
    ecaused they are just BETTER!! Thats why. If you dont get it, you just dont get it. Buy one and use it for a while, and you will know too the grace of the impact driver...Just remeber to get some ear plugs, because the noise can be a little annoying....



    No one makes a finer Impact driver than Makita!!

    Nuff said about impacts...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    4,970
    hummmm ...... well Im glad someone asked that question being I never really understood what an impact driver was . I guess I always took for granted it was like a light duty roto hammer. Being I have a big roto hammer I never worried about how they work.

    Now I pretty much use regular 9 volt makita drills..... ya I know 9 volt. What the heck , they have served me fine for years. now Im mainly putting in and removing 8x 1/2 and 7x 1/2 sheetmetal screws. so tell me .......is there any advantage of an impact driver at installing screws over a regular drill ??????? I know Im not doing enough bolts to justify it.


    I dont want something that twisting the heads off either . those small sheetmetal screws wont take a lot of twist especially going through s's or something thick.

    [Edited by dec on 05-28-2006 at 03:03 PM]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    4,917
    Originally posted by dec



    I dont want something that twisting the heads off either . those small sheetmetal screws wont take a lot of twist especially going through s's or something thick.

    [Edited by dec on 05-28-2006 at 03:03 PM]
    After you have twisted a few heads off sheetmetal screws, you get a "sense" of how far you can go... Time on the tool, and you know when to back off..

    They shoot more screws per charge than any cordless drill...As a matter of fact, my 9.6V impact driver drives more screws per charge than my buddy's 18V drill. Plus it weighs less, is smaller, and can fit in more small spaces than a clunky 18V ever could.

    It does suck at drilling when you have an optional chuck installed, but then again, that why you also have a cordless drill as well.. plus the quick change chuck makes changing bit really fast, and they dont loosen and fall out like with a cordless drill does....

  10. #10
    I just got the NEW 18V Makita Impact, with the lithium-ion battary! Lasted twice as long, Twice as light. It is the nmicest drill I have ever had.!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    2,111
    I have a set of small Crafstman bits with hex drive I use in mine.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Colorado flatland native
    Posts
    15,067
    Originally posted by oloenneker
    [/img]
    No one makes a finer Impact driver than Makita!!



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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    i own a Makita and use DeWalt everyday at work. the Makita is better hands down.
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

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