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  1. #1
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    Oil Heaters On York YKNCNC

    I have a bad thermostat on a oil heater on a YKNC at a textile mill. I have ordered a new one that will be delivered tomorrow morning. My questions is why would this chiller have 2 oil heaters? Both heaters are 1500 watts, but one is 115V and the other is 575V. There is no wiring diagram on the unit. Just curious if anyone else has seen this before?

    Thanks to all and glad to be a part of this site.

  2. #2
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    Austell, Ga.
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    Yes..That was common practice on the early YK's to have dual oil heaters. The thermostats are located in the heater cover, The thermostat for the 3ph. heater controls a relay in a box besides the oil pump starter. The 115 volt heater uses the 20 amp lower fuse in the control panel. York was very serious about keeping the oil temp. up on the early YK's.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  3. #3
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    Thanks Richard. Why does the thermostat in the 575V heater control the relay? I notice the contact of the relay is fed from the auxiliary contacts of the oil pump. Again not having a wiring diagram I am just curious as to why one heater is controlled off of its internal t-stat and the other is put in play by the oil pump starter? Also why 575V and 115V heater. Seems strange.

    Your help and input is greatly appreciated.

    Mike

  4. #4
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    I cannot even attempt a guess on what the engineers thinking was at the time installing two huge heaters on the early YK's. The new ones uses the "Micro-Processor" to heat the oil only 50-55f above the "Saturation" temp.In some cases the oil might be just 100f before the panel allows a start.. Seems to work quite well and the heaters do not cremate the oil during the off cycle by trying to maintain the 140-145f we are all so used to. What will REALLY shake one up is when you find ICE on the top of a new YK oil sump while the chiller is running..Scared the hell out of me when I saw it on my first one.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  5. #5
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    LOL. Thanks again Richard for your input, it is greatly appreciated. Hope you have a great day tomorrow.

    Mike

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibabamafan View Post
    Thanks Richard. Why does the thermostat in the 575V heater control the relay? I notice the contact of the relay is fed from the auxiliary contacts of the oil pump. Again not having a wiring diagram I am just curious as to why one heater is controlled off of its internal t-stat and the other is put in play by the oil pump starter? Also why 575V and 115V heater. Seems strange.

    Your help and input is greatly appreciated.

    Mike
    The 575V heater relay coil is energized through a series circuit consisting of the thermostat and a normally closed set of auxillary contacts on the oil pump starter thus preventing heater operation while the chiller is running. I believe they use the thermostat contacts for pilot duty only as they are not rated for 575V.

  7. #7
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    Again your response is appreciated. You are a classy gentleman. I hope somehow I can help someone or you in the future. I have been doing this for 36 years. How long have you been in the industry? You have a great knowledge.

    Take care,

    Mike

  8. #8
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    Austell, Ga.
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    I was born into this trade...My father taught the first A/C Refigeration trade school in Georgia(Industrial Trades Institute) in the mid 40's. When I worked for him I got food and lodging at the age of 12. He always said I was overpaid then. I was job foreman at the age of 15 building the first refrigerated ham plant in Georgia(Talmadge Farms, Lovejoy) installing 350 tons of refrigeration with the largest units(Brunner) being a Full 5 tons capacity. For years I travelled taking care of the American Embassies and whatever the Charge-de-Affairs pushed upon me from Tuna boats(Panama) to getting water to the Guatemalens after a severe earthquake. From Moscow to Madras and Legos to Recife...Been there...done that..
    I am now 71 and have retired twice..(The Brett Favre of HVAC)
    Working(Ha) now at a data center whilst retired
    Damn.....Reads like a resume.....
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardL View Post
    I was born into this trade...My father taught the first A/C Refigeration trade school in Georgia(Industrial Trades Institute) in the mid 40's. When I worked for him I got food and lodging at the age of 12. He always said I was overpaid then. I was job foreman at the age of 15 building the first refrigerated ham plant in Georgia(Talmadge Farms, Lovejoy) installing 350 tons of refrigeration with the largest units(Brunner) being a Full 5 tons capacity. For years I travelled taking care of the American Embassies and whatever the Charge-de-Affairs pushed upon me from Tuna boats(Panama) to getting water to the Guatemalens after a severe earthquake. From Moscow to Madras and Legos to Recife...Been there...done that..
    I am now 71 and have retired twice..(The Brett Favre of HVAC)
    Working(Ha) now at a data center whilst retired
    Damn.....Reads like a resume.....

    Love your "resume." I hope the young bucks you are working with are taking advantage of your experience. I would like to add to this thread. The 575 oil heater has two legs energized by the aux contacts on the oil pump. This keeps some of the heater energized whenever the oil pump is off. The T stat in the oil heater cycles the pilot relay which essentially trims the oil temp. The 120v heater on the chillers I have serviced was disconnected in the past and are only running on the high voltage heater.

    To add to the mess. Some of the machines I have worked on were converted to Opti-view. Style C machines running optiview do not have the ability to control the oil heater as the RO's used to run the oil heater are used to fire liquid line, oil return, and high speed thrust solenoids (which were obsoleted on the style D machine). Style D machine now uses one of those relays to control the oil heater........

    Wow, should not be this complicated. Its an oil heater !

  10. #10
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    I need to have something explained to me. This thread is over three years old. The original poster joined, asked his question, got his answer and hasn't been on the forum since the day he joined.

    Even RichardL hasn't been on the forum since April (and I miss his posts).

    You (bbarry464) joined two years ago and you dug up this three year old thread to make your first post. I don't understand why when there are so many more recent threads with people awaiting help.

    I'm not saying its wrong, I'm just trying to understand the reasoning.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KnewYork View Post
    I need to have something explained to me. This thread is over three years old. The original poster joined, asked his question, got his answer and hasn't been on the forum since the day he joined.

    Even RichardL hasn't been on the forum since April (and I miss his posts).

    You (bbarry464) joined two years ago and you dug up this three year old thread to make your first post. I don't understand why when there are so many more recent threads with people awaiting help.

    I'm not saying its wrong, I'm just trying to understand the reasoning.

    Knewyork,
    When you put it like that it is almost funny. Forgive me for my ignorance on this forum. I have tried to post in the past but always had some issue with my account. I'm still learning to navigate the site, and do not know "where" the new posts are that need help.

    As my experience is extensive with Carrier, York, Dunham Bush, Multistack, and Turbocor (lots of Trane experience but I would not say "extensive" on Trane) I would like to help out but I'm still learning the nuances of the site. had I not got an email saying you replied to this thread I would have never known.

    If you would like to give me a crash course on how this all runs I would be very interested.

    feel free to email me as well. Sorry, email addresses are not permitted in post. Please put it in your profile, thank you.
    Last edited by beenthere; 09-12-2015 at 08:15 PM. Reason: email

  12. #12
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    First of all, don't post your email address in a post. (The mods will be along shortly to delete it.) It's for your protection as every bot on the internet can read it. Put your email address in your profile where only other members can see it.

    If you click on the "Chillers Open Forum", for instance, the thread at the top is the newest. I'm not sure how you find a three year old post unless you did a search. If you click on the original poster's (or any other member for that matter) screen name and click on "view profile" you can see when they joined and the last time they visited the site.

    I wasn't "busting your chops" as you indicated in another thread. I am curious by nature and wondered why old threads are dredged up and responded to as if they were new. You aren't the first nor will you be the last to do this. I was trying to figure out how it happens when the newest thread is always at the top of the forum.

  13. #13
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    Sorry, email addresses are not permitted in post. Please put it in your profile, thank you.
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