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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185

    Texas cities for Newbies?

    Last September I went to an intensive 2 week school which was an awesome Experience. The school was Lindsay-Cooper in Irving, Texas. Anyhow, I am in refresher mode and reading my HVAC textbook everyday to get back up to speed and ready to tackle any job that comes my way. I am now in Colorado and moving to a city in Texas to get a real HVAC job and gain the experience that is necessary to be a seasoned HVAC Technician. The city I am thinking of Moving to is San Antonio or possibly Austin or Houston. I am getting my EPA Certification as soon as I get back to Texas. I have all my own tools. Does anyone have any advice on what cities are good to find a HVAC job? And what traits does an employer look for when hiring graduates? What would be a good entry-level wage?
    Last edited by WMG; 03-20-2012 at 03:38 PM. Reason: Misleading title

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    brooklyn ny
    Posts
    103
    you need to know that an entry level job is having to work form the ground up it will take time to learn all the in and outs off this trade and wage depents on what you cant do for the boss to keep in business.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,841
    Quote Originally Posted by seemungaln View Post
    you need to know that an entry level job is having to work form the ground up it will take time to learn all the in and outs off this trade and wage depents on what you cant do for the boss to keep in business.
    You mean going to school for 2 weeks six months ago isn't enough?

    Entry level wages vary across the country. I would say minimum wage-13 or 14 bucks an hour depending on location and experience
    Officially, Down for the count

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    In the school I learned the basics so I have a clue about the refrigeration, electrical control system, charging and evacuating a system, etc. Im by no means a licensed technician but I am light years ahead of knowing what I knew before. And I do have the confidence to diagnose a system and troubleshoot components, etc. They say you can't go wrong with A/C in Texas during the summer. But it is definetly time to refresh my memory because it is my goal to gain serious HVAC experience this summer. All these terms like Superheat, subcool, pull a vacuum, ohms, phase, R-410 are lingering in my brain trying to remember what they said 6 months ago.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Dallas,Texas
    Posts
    4,985
    San Antonio, Austin or Houston are all good choices. Dallas is full from the last 5 classes at Linsay-Cooper.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    185
    Yeah. That school is in high demand. When I was there they taught classes 7 days a week. English and Spanish.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,652
    I'm in Austin. So you're experience level is 2 weeks of school? Any field training? You will most likely start out as an installers helper making $10/hr or so and will get worked like a mule. It will test you mentally and physically. Mostly physically. 140 degrees in an attic for 2-3 changeouts a day physical, working til midnight. Depending on who you work for. I hope you're in good shape and can put up with lots of crap. There are a million guys here who try the job out and get their asses kicked. That is where the mental toughness comes in . You gotta put up with the BS, keep a positive attitude and bust ass. If you're a good helper and pick up stuff quick and your leadman isn't a prick that just wants a grunt and actually teaches you something. You can move up to lead installer where you have to prove yourself once again and within 2 years or so maybe be a tech. If they don't lay you off when it starts cooling off in October. You gotta stand out. I don't want to burst your bubble, because it seems like you have a Tebow attitude. But you don't know squat and don't have much value with 2 weeks of schooling honestly. Good luck. You've got a hard 2-3 years in front of you. Stay out of San Antonio or Houston for reasons I won't go into here.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,731
    Folks can go to a 2 or 3 or 4 year tech school course... and STILL they hire on as beginners, at beginner wages.

    There is NO substitution for lots of on the job experience in this field... and IMO no amount of schooling will teach one what a few years on the job will.

    It is no surprise most states require 4 years of verifiable full time employment to qualify to test for a license in heating and AC. The reason: It takes that long to learn it...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    I'm in Austin. So you're experience level is 2 weeks of school? Any field training? You will most likely start out as an installers helper making $10/hr or so and will get worked like a mule. It will test you mentally and physically. Mostly physically. 140 degrees in an attic for 2-3 changeouts a day physical, working til midnight. There are a million guys here who try the job out and get their asses kicked. That is where the mental toughness comes in . You gotta put up with the BS, keep a positive attitude and bust ass. If you're a good helper and pick up stuff quick and your leadman isn't a prick that just wants a grunt and actually teaches you something. If they don't lay you off when it starts cooling off in October. You gotta stand out. I don't want to burst your bubble, because it seems like you have a Tebow attitude. But you don't know squat and don't have much value with 2 weeks of schooling honestly. Good luck. You've got a hard 2-3 years in front of you. Stay out of San Antonio or Houston for reasons I won't go into here.
    This guy hit it on the button. Before I started my own company i was a service manager for a commercial refrigeration company, and I interviewed guys like you all the time. That 2 week course is a joke, and it pisses me off that they actually tell you guys that you can get a good paying job by taking it. Its a complete lie. If you get an interview, dont be the guy who thinks he knows everything because you have some 2 week certificate. Be the guy who says I dont know **** but I want to learn and I will do anything it takes to be an asset to this company. and yes your pay will be small, but there is no one on this forum that started out at 18$ an hour, in Texas at least, especially in residential, with a 2 week course. Only the strong survive in this industry, thats why I love it. Good luck man.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,140
    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    It is no surprise most states require 4 years of verifiable full time employment to qualify to test for a license in heating and AC. The reason: It takes that long to learn it...
    If you have a strong mechanical aptitude, it will take at least 4-5 years to be "competent". 10 years to be "good", and 15 years to a lifetime to be "one of the best". Even then, only a select few actually qualify. There are also people with 30+ years in the trade who are barely "competent".
    The key to happiness is lower expectations.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,012
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    If you have a strong mechanical aptitude, it will take at least 4-5 years to be "competent". 10 years to be "good", and 15 years to a lifetime to be "one of the best". Even then, only a select few actually qualify. There are also people with 30+ years in the trade who are barely "competent".
    Whatever!!!! This stuff ain''t rocket science, get off the cross we need the wood.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    brooklyn ny
    Posts
    103
    going to school two weeks is not going to kick it in thei trade. why you dont have the type of info you need to have as per say some one with 6-24 months of schooling textbooking trainning is not all handon count been there done that and as a mech you always learning sonething new everyday in life.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    1,012
    Quote Originally Posted by WMG View Post
    Last September I went to an intensive 2 week school which was an awesome Experience. The school was Lindsay-Cooper in Irving, Texas. Anyhow, I am in refresher mode and reading my HVAC textbook everyday to get back up to speed and ready to tackle any job that comes my way. I am now in Colorado and moving to a city in Texas to get a real HVAC job and gain the experience that is necessary to be a seasoned HVAC Technician. The city I am thinking of Moving to is San Antonio or possibly Austin or Houston. I am getting my EPA Certification as soon as I get back to Texas. I have all my own tools. Does anyone have any advice on what cities are good to find a HVAC job? And what traits does an employer look for when hiring graduates? What would be a good entry-level wage?
    Go out and do your best, I did just fine without any a/c schooling like nike says Just do it, if you are half way smart you should be able to land a good job in two years. Sure the big stuff takes special class training but you are not shooting for chiller tech of the year are you? Just go out and learn from the guys above you hit the book at night and build your confidence. All this talk about 15 yrs to be a good tech is just insecurity.

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