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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4
    Do ventless fireplaces put off more heat? Do they put off gas into home?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    yes and it is possible. they also put off a lot of moisture and if the house is built tight all that moisture can result in mold. They also exhaust all the other combustion by-products into the house so it is a really bad idea if you have a tightly built house.

  3. #3
    Just be sure to get the unit with the oxygen depleation switch, that way it will shut down just before you die!

  4. #4

    Ventless Fireplace

    Chris,

    I really think that you should search the site for previous posts before you choose a ventless, (vent free) gas appliance. There have been many posts on them. Most are not favorable. Me personal experience agrees with that majority.


    Ed Carey

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    268
    There are enough concerns that they are NOT approved in Canada. Maybe we are too strict up here because we aren't allowed to shoot people either.

  6. #6

    Canada & Ventless

    Nat,

    I think that you are on to something up there in Canada.

    On both topics.

    As for vent free gas heaters, we were smart down here in about 1978, but we got dumber with time.

    The attached article link is a document dated 1978 from the Consumer Products Safety Commission. It proposed a ban of vent free gas heaters.

    But guess what. The equipment manufacturers and gas companies have a lot of people in their pockets, and this proposal died on the vine.

    Back then we knew they were as unsafe as the CPSC said they were, but we got dumber here and now we use a lot more of them.

    I am in the NE US. As a side note, I also do a lot of consulting work. EVERY home here has a furnace, boiler, or some type of central heating system. The vast majority are fossil fuel fired.

    In comparison, relatively few homes have vent free gas heaters or fireplaces.

    However, I see more soot damage in homes from vent free gas heaters and VF gas fireplaces than all of the fossil fuel fired equipment combined. Do the math there.


    Yep, I think you are on to something up there in Canada.


    http://www.classaction.findlaw.com/r...feb/78010.html



    Regards,

    Ed Carey

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8
    Hello All I am a new member here.

    there is no such thing as a ventless, Non vented , VentFree , unit they are all marketing terms.
    Call a spade a spade

    They are room vented units. Meaning the by-products of burning a fossil fuel are going to be left inside your living space for you to breathe.

    We sell hearth products. All of the lines I carry offer "room vented units" We make a choice not to sell them as we feel they are not a good product have in a home

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    12
    I've read a lot of these vent free threads. I'm surprised at the number of people that get so fired up (no pun intended) about it. I can appreciate everyone's concern for others safety and that is a good thing for everyone here to genuinly care for the safety of their customers. I am kind of split on the topic, but I think in some situations these vent free logs are perfectly fine. I have had a set for a couple of years now in a large masonry fireplace. This is a double sided fireplace that opens up into two separate large rooms. My house is older and not particularly air tight. I crack a window an inch or two when I operate the logs. I have the ceiling fans on low and reverse. I have a two top of the line CO detectors. I maintain the logs and keep them clean. These are great to really heat up the space quickly. I don't run these for long periods of time and our winters are pretty mild here. That is my experience with them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    344

    jod78

    I'm confused with your post. If your logs are in a fireplace one would think the combustion products would go up the chimney.

    Do you have the flue damper closed?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    12
    Yes they are vent free logs in a large brick fireplace. The damper is actually broken so I couldn't shut it, but there is some sheetmetal underneath the damper to seal things up. It's not a 100% seal, but sealed for the most part. I suppose there is a small amount of products that can escape the voids.

  11. #11
    We have many customers with vent free fireplaces. The one and only complaint I have ever heard from any of them is the commonly known fact the white scale and residue left from the moisture.

    For all of these customers this fact is far over shadowed by the comfort, beauty and efficiency. Some even use them as the only source of heat for the entire home because they are tired of pellet and wood stoves.

    If you have one installed make sure to have it cleaned and inspected on a yearly basis. If you do it should burn clean and consistantly for many years.

    p.s.

    Installing a vent free log in a fireplace with an open damper is like burning money. It won't heat your home one bit and will not operate properly either.

  12. #12

    Vent Free Gas Fireplace

    Mckcd,

    "Some even use them as the only source of heat for the entire home because they are tired of pellet and wood stoves".


    Would you do me a favor and post a link to the equipment manufacturer's Installation & Operation Manual for the vent free gas fireplace that those people use to heat their whole house.


    I would like to see if those vent free gas fireplaces are (3.2.3 Labeled*) and (3.2.4 Listed*) as (3.2.1 Approved*) for use as a primary heat source in a residential home.

    Thanks,

    Ed Carey

    (*Ref NFPA 54.2006 / ANSI Z223.1, National Fuel Gas Code)

  13. #13
    Ed:

    It's not that they don't have any other heat source in their home. Most have electric baseboard or electric radiant in the ceiling. They just choose not to use it. I was just trying to prove a point that they are effective.

    I live in a rural area and the local electric co-op has very stable prices. Propane prices have doubled here. It will be interesting to see how many start using electric heat.

    [Edited by mckcd on 10-15-2006 at 10:07 AM]

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