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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    309

    Lesson learned

    Yes, breaker boxes are not usually my cup of tea, but now I have looked at more and see what you guys are talking about.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    442
    A visual aid.

    Name:  breaker-panel.gif
Views: 62
Size:  9.6 KB

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    653
    Quote Originally Posted by SandShark View Post
    A visual aid.

    Name:  breaker-panel.gif
Views: 62
Size:  9.6 KB
    Hi Tuba... glad you got your problem sorted out

    SandShark... Just noticed your attachment, are not the phases the same in the horizontal direction (for vertically installed panels) or is there something that haven't seen yet? Per USA NEC 384 (which we also follow in Canada mostly), and the attachment courtesy of "legacypower dot net" in their training materials from Siemens, showing North American standard layouts for single phase (A & B) and three phase (A, B & C). I know we are not marine electrical techs here, but the source popped up on a search...

    Just curious...

    Sorry all... sent the whole darned file, not just the picture of the load center on page 16. (red-faced!!!) Wondered why the one picture was so big...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by enb54; 03-23-2012 at 02:59 PM. Reason: Sorry

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    442
    Yeah, you're right. Obviously, my attachment isn't a perfect example, but I posted it more to show the phases on the vertical rather than the horizontal.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    653
    Quote Originally Posted by SandShark View Post
    Yeah, you're right. Obviously, my attachment isn't a perfect example, but I posted it more to show the phases on the vertical rather than the horizontal.
    Wasn't trying to be smarmy, just had never heard of that arrangement before, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't exist somewhere in the wild world of electrical wiring. I came across a situation where someone took apart (internally) an electrical distribution panel and rewired it "better", then closed it up, business was sold, and then a problem happened. Took a while to figure that out...

    Anyway, sounds like "tuba" got it all working properly, that's all that matters, we're all here I hope to help each other, not create "issues"...

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    River Forest IL
    Posts
    70
    If everything is supposed to be 120, and at a point you're seeing 240 (again assuming wiring is standard US), I'd check all the neutrals-make sure they are dedicated from stem to stern, and not possibly tied into other hots somehow, and make sure all neutral connections are tight-also from point of equipment back to the breaker panel. I've run across problems on only a few occasions, where a loose neutral caused a 120v circuit to feed 240v to the equipment-the first time I saw it I was going crazy trying to figure out where the other side of the 240 was coming from. An electrician friend of mine told me to check for loose neutrals-and I found an iffy neutral connection in a connection box (8 neutrals wire taped together). I had my doubts, but when I squared away the connection point, I was good to go. Another time I remember I just had a loose neutral at the breaker panel-that one was intermittent, and caused popped fuses that also drove more than one tech nuts...literally just a loose screw.
    Might not be the ultimate answer to what you're up against now-but I don't mind sharing my "well, I've never seen that before" moments-it's worth a check anyway.
    Best of luck-

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    653
    Quote Originally Posted by will smith View Post
    If everything is supposed to be 120, and at a point you're seeing 240 (again assuming wiring is standard US), I'd check all the neutrals-make sure they are dedicated from stem to stern, and not possibly tied into other hots somehow, and make sure all neutral connections are tight-also from point of equipment back to the breaker panel. I've run across problems on only a few occasions, where a loose neutral caused a 120v circuit to feed 240v to the equipment-the first time I saw it I was going crazy trying to figure out where the other side of the 240 was coming from. An electrician friend of mine told me to check for loose neutrals-and I found an iffy neutral connection in a connection box (8 neutrals wire taped together). I had my doubts, but when I squared away the connection point, I was good to go. Another time I remember I just had a loose neutral at the breaker panel-that one was intermittent, and caused popped fuses that also drove more than one tech nuts...literally just a loose screw.
    Might not be the ultimate answer to what you're up against now-but I don't mind sharing my "well, I've never seen that before" moments-it's worth a check anyway.
    Best of luck-
    Yes, a bad neutral will really make your day...

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