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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,480
    sure you could make it HSI.....would take a little bit of experience/talent. I'm pretty sure that there is not a kit for it.

    A lot of people will tell you that your responsible if something goes wrong with it. but your responsible for the furnace until someone new comes along and touches it any way. If your confident that you know what you're doing then go for it.

    Ingenuity!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,841
    Quote Originally Posted by gravity View Post
    sure you could make it HSI.....would take a little bit of experience/talent. I'm pretty sure that there is not a kit for it.

    A lot of people will tell you that your responsible if something goes wrong with it. but your responsible for the furnace until someone new comes along and touches it any way. If your confident that you know what you're doing then go for it.

    Ingenuity!
    You are, of course, correct that there is a level of responsibility in all work. But it's the legal hawk that comes into play that can hang you. If you work on a furnace made by XYZ company and it's passed certification rules in effect at the time of manufacture by all the alphabet groups involved, then if something goes wrong with the appliance and it's not gross negligence on your part, then the damages suffered are very apt to flow right past you and up to the manufacturer, provided everything is the same as it was when certified.

    If, on the other hand, the unit has been modified and you are established as the modifier, then the 'buck' stops there. You are liable for the entire unit as modified. Your lawyer may fight that your modification didn't create the problem (worse if it did!!) but the manufacturer's lawyer will argue with great success that you at least contributed to the failure/issue by modifying the unit. So as much as we say, "buyer beware", when it comes to using your ingenuity to modify a product, you may be a hero for a while, hopefully forever but the risk you take is a quantum leap from just replacing parts with approved parts for that furnace.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    north suburbs of Chicago
    Posts
    640
    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    You are, of course, correct that there is a level of responsibility in all work. But it's the legal hawk that comes into play that can hang you. If you work on a furnace made by XYZ company and it's passed certification rules in effect at the time of manufacture by all the alphabet groups involved, then if something goes wrong with the appliance and it's not gross negligence on your part, then the damages suffered are very apt to flow right past you and up to the manufacturer, provided everything is the same as it was when certified.

    If, on the other hand, the unit has been modified and you are established as the modifier, then the 'buck' stops there. You are liable for the entire unit as modified. Your lawyer may fight that your modification didn't create the problem (worse if it did!!) but the manufacturer's lawyer will argue with great success that you at least contributed to the failure/issue by modifying the unit. So as much as we say, "buyer beware", when it comes to using your ingenuity to modify a product, you may be a hero for a while, hopefully forever but the risk you take is a quantum leap from just replacing parts with approved parts for that furnace.
    I agree 100%. I think most of us have made an 'alteration' if only as a temporary fix. Typically the person with the least cash ,us, will usually be made the scapegoat there is no reason to provide further ammo.

    Look at that water htr company that got sued big time. Some guy gave his pal an old water heater. Pal hooks it up and does not vent the flue. Homeowner croaks and manufacturer gets nailed because there was no sticker on tank about venting it!

    It's at the point where if I have a homeowner asking me on phone how to light a pilot on an older furnace or water heater I have to tell them I can't!

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