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  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    Nope now that wouldn't hardly work would it? But if you removed the high voltage wires with the power off, then turned the power back on like I wrote, it would work like a charm with an ohm meter now wouldn't it?
    yup. thats the only way to check the control circuit

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GAacTech View Post
    yup. thats the only way to check the control circuit
    Actually the check is for the contacts on the high voltage circuit.

  3. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GAacTech View Post
    seq. is a bad design due to its thermal reactance and intermittent operation
    I don't know of any body that will argue with that comment.

    NOTE: The attachment was just a basic interpretation of how a sequencer works, not a 100% accurate drawing of the devices internal components.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  4. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    Nope now that wouldn't hardly work would it? But if you removed the high voltage wires with the power off, then turned the power back on like I wrote, it would work like a charm with an ohm meter now wouldn't it?
    You should never use an "ohm meter" with power on. Use the "volt meter".

  5. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by flanders View Post
    You should never use an "ohm meter" with power on. Use the "volt meter".
    Okay, I give up. Nobody reads anymore

  6. #19
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    South Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    Okay, I give up. Nobody reads anymore
    I understand what you are saying, my comment was stating that if the control circuit is not energizing the relay it WILL read open, you need the power on for the control voltage to check if the relay is actually closing as it should. typically if your getting 240V across a seq. on a single phase heat strip it is still open, getting a V reading of 0 VAC and no amps there is an open limit or strip.

  7. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GAacTech View Post
    I understand what you are saying, my comment was stating that if the control circuit is not energizing the relay it WILL read open, you need the power on for the control voltage to check if the relay is actually closing as it should. typically if your getting 240V across a seq. on a single phase heat strip it is still open, getting a V reading of 0 VAC and no amps there is an open limit or strip.


    Checking with the ohm meter was just in case he wanted to verify the contacts on the sequencer were bad, AFTER checking for voltage across the contacts and reading 240v.

    Which is why I stated you would have to turn the power back on AFTER, removing the wires from the switch to check with an ohm meter.

    I think that if you read what I wrote, then think about what I wrote, you would understand what I wrote. Maybe is because its a full moon tonight. Folks seem to be a little too quick to find something wrong with how people reply in here. Or I am not conveying my thoughts right, probably the latter.

  8. #21
    I agree with tech it out if your confused about weather or not the sequencer is good or not... remove voltage from the contactor side of sequencer but leave control voltage on and I just use the audible continuity test to make sure the sequencer is closing it's contacts when your getting control voltage (if it beeps it closed)

  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobFarns View Post
    I agree with tech it out if your confused about weather or not the sequencer is good or not... remove voltage from the contactor side of sequencer but leave control voltage on and I just use the audible continuity test to make sure the sequencer is closing it's contacts when your getting control voltage (if it beeps it closed)
    That is EXACTLY what I was trying to say, sorry tech it out. long day...

  10. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GAacTech View Post
    That is EXACTLY what I was trying to say, sorry tech it out. long day...
    No worries brudda! (could stand about 6 of those, none in the house though!)

  11. #24
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    Jan 2010
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    I'm sure the original poster is now really confused.

  12. #25
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    Jan 2009
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    Etters PA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tech it out View Post
    Okay, I give up. Nobody reads anymore
    To funny I got it the first time

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk

  13. #26
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    Aug 2004
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    North Richland Hills, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobFarns View Post
    I agree with tech it out if your confused about weather or not the sequencer is good or not... remove voltage from the contactor side of sequencer but leave control voltage on and I just use the audible continuity test to make sure the sequencer is closing it's contacts when your getting control voltage (if it beeps it closed)
    Why bother though, if you measure 240v across the the contacts when they should be closed, you already know the sequencer is bad.

    It is better to test the circuit in normal operation anyway.
    If the contacts are pitted/burned, it is not uncommon for them to sometimes close OK, especially absent the line voltage because of the lack of arcing as they close.
    You can actually end up with a set of contacts that fails under normal voltage and current conditions, but passes a continuity test when it is not switching line voltage.

    Similar thing for a sequencer that is stuck closed.
    The act of disconnecting the wires from it to do a continuity test can disturb it enough to cause the contacts to unstick and open.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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