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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,596

    Contaminated Recovery Cylinders

    We got hit with 4 jugs that were <1% contaminatedand charged us a huge amount to dispose of. Just curious if any of you guys have had this happen to you? One was very legit with a 50/50 mix.

    Keep in mind there are 16 guys who are certified and a lot of us share the tanks. Now everyone is under the microscope. Gotta love it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,516
    i have a 22 tank and a 10 tank and they are mine so there isnt anyone useing the wrong tank
    turn them in and get 2 new ones and they stay with me only
    no problems this way

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,790
    [QUOTE=ryan1088;12636311] charged us a huge amount to dispose of

    How much was that huge amount ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,596
    Somewhere around $1800 if I remember right. Not exactly sure for how many pounds though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,790
    Wow it would be cheaper to buy new cylinders and sit on it. Of course you would have to no beforehand.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,841
    Well wait 'till you get slapped with an illegal jug! Honeywell has new jugs out that do not list the capacity of the tank. I've tried to speak with them about it but they insist the tank capacity is on the tank. It's not but I guess they think they're big enough that they don't need to comply with DOT rules. We haven't been hit with any mixed jugs so I can't comment on that one but $1800 must be for a very large tank. One way to combat accidental mixing is to put locking caps on the cylinders for 22 and 410A. That way at least the guy has to know which key to use to get the cap off. Cheap insurance I'd suggest.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,596
    I didn't explain real well, I think there were 3 or 4 tanks that were contaminated. 1 had a 50/50 mix of 502 and 22 which was an obvious error on our part. The other few were less than 1% mix of something that the dude wasn't able to identify. Pretty odd to me since I looked up the specs on his analyzer and it's +_ 1% accurate itself. So in a knee jerk reaction, we are buying our own analyzer.

    I am just curious if this guy is up to something or if what he's doing is industry standard/practice. I'm still really skeptical about how legit the whole thing is.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    One way to combat accidental mixing is to put locking caps on the cylinders for 22 and 410A. That way at least the guy has to know which key to use to get the cap off. Cheap insurance I'd suggest.
    Good, good, good idea. I accidentally mixed nitrogen with R-22 once. We've never turned that one in.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,879
    psssss just kidding

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