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Thread: York Ram motor

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,173
    We routinely replace bearings on Ram (and any other motors) in the field. The only time shop time is necessary is if there is damage to the motor that is revealed when the bearings are removed or if it's been in service for a long time and it needs to go to the shop to be steam cleaned, dipped and baked.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Austell, Ga.
    Posts
    1,296
    Quote Originally Posted by KnewYork View Post
    We routinely replace bearings on Ram (and any other motors) in the field. The only time shop time is necessary is if there is damage to the motor that is revealed when the bearings are removed or if it's been in service for a long time and it needs to go to the shop to be steam cleaned, dipped and baked.
    Very well put KY. As da' man sez'...Unless there are signs of damages to the bearing housings or shaft journals, I would also prefer to replace the bearings "On-Site". The very distinct possibillity of damaging the motor further "Always" exists when moving that much weight from a penthouse or from a basement catacomb. Hell...in Los Angeles years ago I had a great motor shop (Larson & Hogue) come on site at #1 Wilshire Blvd. Penthouse a 1000hp, form coil Tonrac motor "In Place".. I have no idea if they are even still in business today, but them guys were good for sure.
    I have watched with much interest at the old York plant when they would mount a motor on the YK's and albeit that few of us have a 20 ton overhead crane with a set of precision weight scales hanging down or even room to place such in our cramped equipment rooms, I have since developed my own method of determining how many shims to cram under the motor feet for the minimum twisting, bending of the motor in question.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    136

    You said it all

    We routinely replace bearings on Ram (and any other motors) in the field. The only time shop time is necessary is if there is damage to the motor that is revealed when the bearings are removed or if it's been in service for a long time and it needs to go to the shop to be steam cleaned, dipped and baked.

    Thats the problem, York HAS routinely changed bearings on there motors, to the point that it becomes just a mainternance task.



    (You do as you,ve done for years until you get burned, then you do it differently.)

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,173
    Quote Originally Posted by synergy
    Thats the problem, York HAS routinely changed bearings on there motors, to the point that it becomes just a mainternance task.
    That is a totally unfounded statement. When I said routinely it wasn't a statement of frequency. My experience has been motor bearing replacement being required in the 35,000-60,000 hour range depending on how the machine was maintained and run. To put that in perspective, on the low end it's a machine that has run 24/7 for four years. But as most of us know a machine that is run 24/7 is likely to have longer bearing life if the bearings are properly lubricated with the correct grease. The bearings that tend not to last are the machines that have high start to run ratios or ones that sit idle without being properly rotated during the down time.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Northwest Louisiana
    Posts
    277
    These kinds of problems were very rare when Reliance, Westinghouse, or Toshiba motors were used. We have run into same issues with vibration and bearing failures on Ram Motors. Because we have a sister company that is a well staffed motor shop, I have access to Level 3 vibration technicans. Both agree that Ram motors are "too light". Not enough metal, frames twists etc. We try to always replace Ram motors with used/surplus motors our motor shop guy can find in his circle of suppliers. Motor shop re-conditions motor to like new and when we install it is amazing how much smoother and quiet they operate. When we install we bring along one of the motor techs to check vibration, usually we add shims under back feet until vibration is at lowest level. This has worked out well for us as we can ususally get chiller back on-line in couple weeks instead of waiting for Baltimore Parts.
    A LITTLE BIT OF STUPID GOES A LONG WAY!

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    37
    We always do them in the field

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