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  1. #1
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    Feb 2008
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    Receiver/subcooler

    I was doing some reading and came across this, Never heard of this, but I guess it makes sense.

    "If you cannot measure any subcooling at the
    condenser outlet, but you are fairly certain the unit
    has enough refrigerant, then check the temperature
    of the liquid line leaving the receiver. Some manufacturers
    (Heatcraft for one) use the condensing unit
    receiver as the subcooler rather than adding tubing to
    the condenser coil."

  2. #2
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    and before everyone rushes to point out that subcooling is not an important measurement when dealing with a receiver...

    I know, and that's not the topic.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    But back into the condenser right?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss
    But back into the condenser right?
    Basically.


    The condenser empties into the receiver, then the liquid leaves the condenser, goes through a small coil and out to the equipment.

    Hard to see a whole lot of heat transfer from a vessel like a receiver.

  6. #6
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    yeah I've seen that.

    but they are talking about using the receiver as a subcooler..in particular, Heat Craft condensing units.

    Now condensing units usually have the receiver in the direct air stream off of the condenser.

    If they were using the receiver as a subcooler, wouldn't it make more sense to place the receiver in the condensers air intake?

  7. #7
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    And I've never seen a receiver placed outside the condensing unit in the condensers air intake.

    However I have seen plenty of larger remote air cooled condensers with the receivers located under them in the intake air. Never thought about why.

    maybe this is why

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    And I've never seen a receiver placed outside the condensing unit in the condensers air intake.

    However I have seen plenty of larger remote air cooled condensers with the receivers located under them in the intake air. Never thought about why.

    maybe this is why
    I kind figured it was because they'd look silly with a big tank sitting on top of all the fans.


    Funny you mentioned it, though. That was immediately where my thinking went when you mentioned receiver in the incoming air.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2009
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    Mid-Mo
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    E

    This is all very interesting to me. Mcquay AGS screws use a what looks like a radiator that is 3x1x2" as what they call an economizer. It subcooling the liquid from the condenser and injects it back into the compressor to cool the gate. I could see them using a similiar setup but dump it back into the liquid line rather than back into the compressor.

    Side note--we have a lot of Heatcraft equipment but havent seen that yet. I'm sure that's the latest thing that's right around the corner for the rest of us.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    257
    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    yeah I've seen that.

    but they are talking about using the receiver as a subcooler..in particular, Heat Craft condensing units.

    Now condensing units usually have the receiver in the direct air stream off of the condenser.

    If they were using the receiver as a subcooler, wouldn't it make more sense to place the receiver in the condensers air intake?
    All of my receivers are heat traced and insulated, the machines fail in the winter here if the heater breaks due to loss of pressure after a defrost. I might add that the roof can get down to -10f for a couple months. We would only be able to subcool after the receiver here.

  11. #11
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    Guayaquil EC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phase Loss View Post
    I was doing some reading and came across this, Never heard of this, but I guess it makes sense.

    "If you cannot measure any subcooling at the
    condenser outlet, but you are fairly certain the unit
    has enough refrigerant, then check the temperature
    of the liquid line leaving the receiver. Some manufacturers
    (Heatcraft for one) use the condensing unit
    receiver as the subcooler rather than adding tubing to
    the condenser coil."
    I'm curious as to who wrote this and where he got that statement about Heatcraft using the receiver for subcooling.

  12. #12
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    Dick Wirz Commercial Refrigeration.

    I'll PM ya.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2004
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    up in the hizzy
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    Thats a good read! I'm also a little puzzled about it, Dick talks about sizing the condenser to match the evaporator load without taking into consideration the heat of compression, I also dont get why an increase in condenser capacity would also increase the temperature differential in the evaporator.

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