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Thread: Freon Reclaim

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Central NC
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    165
    A couple of technicians came to replace a solenoid valve on our chiller recently. They had to recover 140 pounds of R-22. Since they put the R-22 into tanks that they received from the reclaim center that they use, they didn't trust the cleanliness of the tanks and so did not recycle it, but put fresh freon in. One technician said that the reclaim center claims that the tanks are clean, but "you never know."

    I can understand that they would not recycle the old freon so that they may warrant their work. (I also understand that this is standard practice.) But I am fairly certain that the reclaim center would trust its own tanks and reclaim the R-22 to be resold. 140 pounds of freon cost between $300 and $400 when we purchased it. Does the company that the techs worked for receive credit for that much freon? Shouldn't we be receiving some kind of credit for that much freon rather than being charged for the Recovery/Reclaim service?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
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    18,207
    If thats all you paid fot the freon, you should be jumping for joy!

    Have you ever seen the charactors that work at recycleing centers?
    To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order, we must put the family in order; to put the family in order, we must cultivate our personal life; and to cultivate our personal life, we must first set our hearts right.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indy
    Posts
    5

    reclaim

    I agree, you got a great price for the R-22. However I think the contractors concern over the cleanliness of the recovery taks was either paranoia or BS.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Near Atlanta, GA.
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    14,620
    I'm not a chiller guy so maybe I don't understand, but why replace the charge in a system just because you change a solenoid valve? Unless there's an indication of a problem with the refrigerent or some type of contamination I don't get it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    165
    The circuit holds 250 pounds of freon according to the spec plate on the chiller. The reason that they had to recover it in the first place was that the factory installed cut-offs would not isolate the solenoid valve itself, but only the section that includes the dryer, the solenoid valve, the EXV, and the heat exchanger. So whatever was not in the compressors and the condenser coils had to be pulled out. If they had more control of the compressors, I'm sure that they could have valved off three of the four compressors in the circuit and used the other compressor to pump more of the refrigerant into the condenser coils. If they thought of this I don't know, but it would certainly take more than a casual knowledge of this type of chiller to do that if it could be done at all.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    129
    Im with K....I dont understand why the gas was replaced? It was a good price on the 22 though

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    887
    It's a great price. They charged enough to get the old stuff processed and basically gave away the replacement.

    There is no money back exchange on freon. The old stuff has a negative value. It's a waste material to be processed.
    It will cost their company to get the recovered refrigerant processed.

    They should have charged (materials + markup + recovery cost), not (recovery cost).
    I am for doing good to the poor, but...I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. I observed...that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.
    ― Benjamin Franklin

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    17
    2.87 per pund of r-22 DOOD!! Quit crying...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    17
    oh.. and as far as techs getting kickbacks..

    this is a dog eat dog business.. do u know how 100 deg weather and leaving at 5 am getting home at 12 am feels like??? well if u are gonna 'NOT TRUST' ur a/c company than shoot... DO IT YOURSELF.....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Central NC
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    165
    well if u are gonna 'NOT TRUST' ur a/c company than shoot... DO IT YOURSELF...
    Please read this thread in the spirit of inquiry into the modus operandi, not in the spirit of distrust of the techs that serviced the equipment.

    They should have charged (materials + markup + recovery cost), not (recovery cost).
    We provided the freon, they did not. They charged labor + recovery cost. They took 140 lbs of our freon out and put it in their van and opened our sealed jugs of freon and charged the system. (I'm not upset, I just want to make sure that the facts are clear. Again, I don't distrust them. They were great guys to talk to and it was evident that they knew what they were doing.)

    oh.. and as far as techs getting kickbacks..
    I trust the fact that they are not receiving kickback, and as I stated before, I understand the need to not recycle freon that has potential contamination in order to warrant the work that is done.

    this is a dog eat dog business.. do u know how 100 deg weather and leaving at 5 am getting home at 12 am feels like???
    I hope that this is not the prevailing ethical standard in the HVAC industry.

    There is no money back exchange on freon. The old stuff has a negative value. It's a waste material to be processed.
    It will cost their company to get the recovered refrigerant processed
    Most of it cannot possibly qualify as "waste material." According to the material I received to study for CFC certification, the following is true: "Simply put, the term 'reclaim' means to 'reprocess.' When you reclaim refrigerant i[t] means you reprocess refrigerant to a level equal to new-product specifications as determined by chemical analysis. Under EPA regulations, refrigerant must be reclaimed to a purity level as specified by ARI 700." They take it to a "reclaim" facility, so they must be "reclaiming" most of it. It just seems reasonable that a large enough quantity of reclaimable freon would merit a credit rather than a fee since the reclaimed freon will be sold for between $70 and $100 dollars per 30 pound jug and probably more once it can no longer be manufactured or imported.

    All that I can say is, Reclaim must be a lucrative business seeing that they get people coming and going. They make the HVAC companies pay them to take it and then they sell it back to them.

    These comments are repectfully submitted.

  11. #11
    15 years ago people talked about "reclaiming" refrigerant.

    Today .... after all these years of suffering along with sucking it out of systems ... we simply "recover" which means we remove it from the sealed system so that we can work on the components.

    Had anyone really intended us to service the sealed systems, they would have installed Henry valves to isolate every component of the sealed system.



    Some outfits choose to make the policy they never return a system's refrigerant to the system after they have "recovered" or removed it.

    It should be a judgement call on the part of the mechanic who is running the job.

    Whenever there is doubt about the integrity of the refrigerant which was removed, it should never be returned to the customer's system. And once again, this should be made as a judgement call on the part of the guy in the field, not the person in the office.


    But franly, R-22 ... unless it is a small quantity and dirty ... I would return the gas and spend $$$ on filter cartriges rather than virgin refrigerant.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    Posts
    68
    I think it is ood, if you ecover the freon with a filter before your recovery machine, and install new filter/driers you should be able to use the freon again unless there was a major burnout. in Wisconsin the freon belongs to the ownwer of the equipment so it should be returned to the system or options to the owner as to disposal of it.

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