Fireplace Gas Line Runs Down Inside Wall, Fireplace Doors
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Red face Fireplace Gas Line Runs Down Inside Wall, Fireplace Doors

    My house was built in the early 1960s and had a masonry wood burning fireplace which we had converted to gas logs about 8-10 years ago. The gas line was run through the masonry, down the inside wall next to the fireplace, veers left, and around the corner into the fireplace. This leaves a gap where the fireplace door unit is not sealed as the gas line is entering behind it. Is there a way to fix this as it is unsightly? Or are there times that this is the only way to run the gas line?

    The damper is permanently open because of the gas logs. The basement, where the fireplace is located, is always freezing. The doors on the fireplace are drafty and need to be replaced. How can I install and seal new fireplace doors around this gas line. Would the fireplace doors need to be custom-made with a cut out for the gas line? What is the best way to seal the fireplace? Are different types of fireplace doors used for gas logs as opposed to "old-fashioned" log fireplaces?
    Would the distance the line runs from the source effect the cost of using the gas logs? Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by ECKSGIRL7; 02-26-2012 at 10:50 PM. Reason: Wanted to add image; but can't

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    7,281
    Relocated to the fireplace section

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    199
    I'm not understanding how the gas line is run, does it cut across the face of the front of the fireplace then goes into the opening?

  4. #4
    The gas line comes out of the wall on the right side, then goes down the wall, and then, it goes into the side of the fireplace. Once inside, it goes under the inside of the fireplace. Does this description help? i have a picture of the fireplace but couldn't figure out how to attach it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,132

    Cool

    Vader, I think the gas pipe is exposed even if they had a glass enclosure. I would find another gas fitter to investigate routing the gas line outside then drill into the rear or back corner of the firebox so you can install standard glass doors without any whacking a cutout for the gas pipe into its leg.

    You can now get gasketed tight doors but just understand you must open the doors wide open during burning or else you'll have a pile of 40,000 Chicklets that used to be your tempered glass. It could also result in ruining the gas valve as most are only rated for 175F.

    While the most expensive option, installing a gas direct vent insert will negate the cold air issues, provide awesome supplemental zone heat and function as a backup heat source during power outages.
    HTH

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    199
    I agree with hearthman. sounds like you need to have a professional rerun the gas line. also to note even with "sealed" fireplace doors, you will still get some cold air infiltration, as usually around the glass of the doors is unsealed.

    And also in agreement with Hearthman, a gas insert fireplace sounds like the thing to do if you can afford it. Vented gas logs are not meant for heat. so if you were looking at something to heat with, a insert would be the way to go, whether its gas pellet or wood, inserts are a great supplemental heat source.

    The length of gas run does not effect the cost of running a gas appliance, aslong as the pipe is sized correctly and pressure set correctly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event