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Thread: Life Expectancy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    New Jersey
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    Life Expectancy

    I did not see anyone give a life expectancy. So if I have a 3-ton minimate running 24X7 what is the life expectancy?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Western PA
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    AGaito,

    I had to start a new thread for you to get an answer.



    It's kind of hard to predict unit lifespan. Things like installation, operating conditions and maintenance are all factors that cannot always be accounted for.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    New Jersey
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    You have to assume it has been installed and maintained properly. Is it 10, 15 or 20 years?

  4. #4
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    Honestly, I'm not familiar enough with that particular type of equipment to speak with any degree of authority on the subject. I cannot accurately answer your question.

    Someone else should be able to, though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
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    As a general rule, and I do mean general, commercial hvac equipment has a life expectancy of 15-20 years. After 30 years in the business I have NEVER seen a customer replace anything just because its "life expectancy" is up. Most building owners fix it till it costs too much to do so, like major rust issues or everything failing at once.
    Minimates, for as much as they cost, do seem to have more than their share of problems. But you should still get 15 vyears out of it. Another option would be a mini-split system, such as Sanyo, Carrier or others.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Central Texas
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    Why does everyone assume that a mini-split can be used to replace a MiniMate unit. They are completly different. MiniMates are Critical Cooling units, designed to operate at -20F outside air temps and for 24hrs a day 365days a year for 15-20 years. Mini-splits are Comfort cooling units that typically only handle 60F ambient or above for 12-16hrs a day and 9mo a year.

    The difference between Critical Cooling and Comfort Cooling is the amount of Latent Heat the units remove. Comfort Cooling will remove up to 60% Sensible Heat with the other 40% going to Latent Heat. The Critical Cooling unit will remove up to 90% of Sensible Heat load and only 10% of Latent Heat. In a Server Room, telephone closet, or other equipment room, there isn't any Latent heat to remove. Just the Sensible Heat from the equipment. So using a comfort cooling unit would require the system to be oversized to handle the sensible heat load while also risking removing too much moisture from the space and causing the RH to drop low enough to allow electrostatic discharge on the equipment being cooled.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Dry as a bone Tucson
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by sgraefe View Post
    Why does everyone assume that a mini-split can be used to replace a MiniMate unit. They are completly different. MiniMates are Critical Cooling units, designed to operate at -20F outside air temps and for 24hrs a day 365days a year for 15-20 years. Mini-splits are Comfort cooling units that typically only handle 60F ambient or above for 12-16hrs a day and 9mo a year.

    The difference between Critical Cooling and Comfort Cooling is the amount of Latent Heat the units remove. Comfort Cooling will remove up to 60% Sensible Heat with the other 40% going to Latent Heat. The Critical Cooling unit will remove up to 90% of Sensible Heat load and only 10% of Latent Heat. In a Server Room, telephone closet, or other equipment room, there isn't any Latent heat to remove. Just the Sensible Heat from the equipment. So using a comfort cooling unit would require the system to be oversized to handle the sensible heat load while also risking removing too much moisture from the space and causing the RH to drop low enough to allow electrostatic discharge on the equipment being cooled.
    Great explanation sgraef. Never read it written any better than this. Thanks.
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