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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,633
    I've heard all the bad ideas. I've got a piece of painted plywood in the window to my right even as I type this. But I'd never do that for a customer because of the lack of security, poor insulation, etc. Has anyone ever seen a good way of filling that gap?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valdosta Ga
    Posts
    847

    Hmm

    Duct board spray painted

  3. #3
    Senior Tech Guest
    A glass pane with frame.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    You're right, ST, worked for me once. Relatives house and I went to the ReUse store and got an older window in good condition, trimmed it a little and painted the double window exterior. New window sat above the window shaker and the window next to it was a combination but the paint made it look almost custome made. Stays in all winter by covering the a/c outside.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Well, the one I put in my bedroom I just close the window on, it has the "wings" that expand on each side and somewhat cover the window opening. The remaining gaps I take an old towel and wad up in them.

    Not bad for an HVAC guy eh?!
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    i think some butcher uses Vulkem to seal............
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    Originally posted by amickracing
    Well, the one I put in my bedroom I just close the window on, it has the "wings" that expand on each side and somewhat cover the window opening. The remaining gaps I take an old towel and wad up in them.

    Not bad for an HVAC guy eh?!

    Don't think you got the picture.

    filling the gap above a window AC on windows that slide left/right?

  8. #8
    Are you installing a "casement window a/c"?

    Installation Instructions

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    I would use 2 aluminum strips. Do the inside first, fill with insulation(great stuff) and then outside strip. Attach with small alum. self tappers.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Originally posted by MikeJ
    Don't think you got the picture.

    filling the gap above a window AC on windows that slide left/right?
    You'll have to forgive me, I wasn't really giving a good reply as in how to fill in the gaps.... just how I hacked something together for mine. Sorry for the confusion
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    No problemo, and by this time there is probably a huge picture of C. J. Jones installed above the a/c.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,633
    Thanks for the replies guys.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    440
    Originally posted by Irascible
    I've heard all the bad ideas. I've got a piece of painted plywood in the window to my right even as I type this. But I'd never do that for a customer because of the lack of security, poor insulation, etc. Has anyone ever seen a good way of filling that gap?
    Why is there a gap? Can you bring the sliding
    window down to the top of the A/C?

    This was my business, so I can tell you how
    they did it on Miami Beach. There is no reason
    why plywood cannot be can't be made secure.
    A window with a window unit in it is really
    never going to be truly secure. Make sure
    the unit has a good downward pitch toward
    outside.

    Ductbaord will give you less security, but you
    could add ductboard to plywood for insulation
    purposes. Note: plywood has more insulation
    value than glass.

    Cheers,
    Michael

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