Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 27 to 39 of 40
  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,097
    A properly sized unit will have long run times to keep up. And it is suppose to have long run times.

    They can use the same digital manometer to test static pressure, as they use to test gas pressure on gas furnaces.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    17
    As far as the house, we have a 1647 SF one-story home (over a crawl space) that we bought 3 years ago and gutted 90% of it and reinsulated prob. 90% of all exterior walls (2x4), installed all new construction Low E argon-filled windows and replaced all but one exterior door with energy efficient ones. We have installed extra insulation in the attic this year before they installed the new heat pump and have R-60 over most of the attic area. Heat loss is not our problem. When we have turned the heat pump off, it took an hour for the thermostat to drop a degree when it was 32 degrees outside.

    Also, we had the installer install all new ductwork when they installed the heat pump. They added cold air returns in the ceilings because we did not have any. We are wondering if there is an issue with the duct work for this unit that is causing the problem. Some of the previous posters in this forum suggested that could at least part of the problem because of the variable speed blower motor pushing against high static pressure (using large amounts of electricity).

    Supposedly, the installer is getting the equipment to perform the static pressure test.

    We have had one of the warmest winters we have had for years and have hardly seen temperatures below freezing (highly unusual). Considering what our electric bills have been, I would hate to see what they were if we had a normal winter with this new unit.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by dj1993 View Post
    As far as the house, we have a 1647 SF one-story home (over a crawl space) that we bought 3 years ago and gutted 90% of it and reinsulated prob. 90% of all exterior walls (2x4), installed all new construction Low E argon-filled windows and replaced all but one exterior door with energy efficient ones. We have installed extra insulation in the attic this year before they installed the new heat pump and have R-60 over most of the attic area. Heat loss is not our problem. When we have turned the heat pump off, it took an hour for the thermostat to drop a degree when it was 32 degrees outside.

    Also, we had the installer install all new ductwork when they installed the heat pump. They added cold air returns in the ceilings because we did not have any. We are wondering if there is an issue with the duct work for this unit that is causing the problem. Some of the previous posters in this forum suggested that could at least part of the problem because of the variable speed blower motor pushing against high static pressure (using large amounts of electricity).

    Supposedly, the installer is getting the equipment to perform the static pressure test.

    We have had one of the warmest winters we have had for years and have hardly seen temperatures below freezing (highly unusual). Considering what our electric bills have been, I would hate to see what they were if we had a normal winter with this new unit.


    if this company doesnt trust a manual J and doesnt know to do/ doesnt have the equipment for a static pressure test i'd be EXTREMELY skeptical of their ability to size ducting IMHO

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    17
    They came yesterday and adjusted the differential on the thermostat to low (they said there was only low, medium & high and it had been set at medium).

    They also brought equipment to do static pressure test. They had an electronic meter with a small length of clear tubing attached to it. They drilled two holes (one in the ductwork below the furnace (going to the ductwork under the house and one in the ductwork above the filter (going to the cold air returns). They stuck the tubing (no probes) up to the holes they drilled and took the readings. Did not stick any tubing or probes into the ductwork. The readings were 0.2 and 0.1 and they said it showed the ductwork was fine. I asked about sticking any probes or the tubing into the holes because everything I have read or videos online that I have viewed about taking static pressure tests said for probes to be placed through the holes into the ducts at a 90 degree angle to the airflow. I was told that there was no need to stick anything into the holes because the airflow would cause false readings.

    Is this the way to take static pressure readings? Is it accurate?

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,989
    Quote Originally Posted by dj1993 View Post
    They came yesterday and adjusted the differential on the thermostat to low (they said there was only low, medium & high and it had been set at medium).

    They also brought equipment to do static pressure test. They had an electronic meter with a small length of clear tubing attached to it. They drilled two holes (one in the ductwork below the furnace (going to the ductwork under the house and one in the ductwork above the filter (going to the cold air returns). They stuck the tubing (no probes) up to the holes they drilled and took the readings. Did not stick any tubing or probes into the ductwork. The readings were 0.2 and 0.1 and they said it showed the ductwork was fine.

    I asked about sticking any probes or the tubing into the holes because everything I have read or videos online that I have viewed about taking static pressure tests said for probes to be placed through the holes into the ducts at a 90 degree angle to the airflow. I was told that there was no need to stick anything into the holes because the airflow would cause false readings.

    Is this the way to take static pressure readings? Is it accurate?
    Two videos showing the proper way to check static pressures:

    Video #One; Measuring Static Pressures

    Video #Two; Measuring Static Pressures

    If your furnace has an evaporator coil on it, there is no-way they are going to get a total of 0.3" static pressure on that system; NO coils, including NO condensing coil in the furnace, then you 'could possibly' get 0.25" SP.

    Most times the probe will NOT be placed ahead of the condensing coil, therefore, the total static reading will Not be read. I have never seen the pressure drop listed on a high-efficiency furnace condenser coil.

    Compare how they took the readings to a PRO showing you how it should be taken.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,097
    Yep, they took the readings the wrong way. Ad it makes it seem like everything is ok.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,671
    eliteair

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,097
    bigshow, this is the Ask Our Pro's forum, and only Pro members that have been vetted by the AOPC may post advise here. Please apply to the AOPC today, thank you.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.


    Further infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    17

    Smile

    Well, update on what has gone on. We did not seem to get any support from Amana. No one could explain why we were having such outrageous energy consumption from the 2 Amana units we had installed. We got very tired of trying to monitor the on/off cycles. We finally told them to pull the Amana system out and put something else in. Amana did not seem too concerned about finding out what was wrong with the system.

    They installed a York communicating system after we had the factory representative come to our house and look at what we had and discusswhat we were expecting and what they would do if we had similar problems. They installed a York 18 SEER communicating sytem and, so far, it has worked fine. No more short cycles on & off or run times of 2-4 hours at a time. The run times seem appropriate for the temperatures. Unfortunately, it has not been as cold consistently as it was prior to this one being installed, but the day-to-day energy consumption is showing that this heat pump has energy consumption more in line with what we should expect. We are hopeful at least. Thanks for all your suggestions and comments.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,537
    Please post back here and let us know how things worked out. As pros we are interested.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,671
    joseph glynn

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Additional infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.

    Your post has been deleted.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    17
    Update on this problem. Our York heat pump system is working great. Our utility bills went down and (so far) we are satisfied with the system. No more run times lasting hours or shutting off for a few minutes only to restart again (like with the Amana). The system has worked great this summer and we have had EXTREMELY high temperatures this summer and our cooling bills have been manageable.

    The company that installed the systems say they are no longer installing Amana or Goodman systems any more because of the problems they were having with them and the lack of support from Amana. I know they were extremely frustrated with Amanda when they were trying to figure out what was going on with the two systems they installed in our house.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    God's country - Shenandoah Valley, VA
    Posts
    355

    Size?

    What size is the York system?

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event