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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    149
    I want to redo the concrete in my back yard. Currently what's there is vintage 1950 concrete that is cracked in many places, and it needs to be removed and replaced. Thing is, that I want to expand the concrete area close to the house, just a little though. And part of the concrete expansion area involves an existing A/C compressor that's on it's own pad.

    Exactly how does one do this? Does it need to be removed and then reinstalled? It appears to be on line long enough such that it could be potentially relocated while the cement work is done, then moved back. Is that a realistic expectation that it could be moved in such a way as to not damage the copper lines then moved back and avoid the whole problem involving a fix and recharge thing? One mason told me that it should be easy enough to move it aside, remove the concrete pad under it, then put it up on cinderblocks, then do the cement work. Then after the cement cures enough, move the compressor aside, remove the cinder blocks and cement in the area where the cinderblocks were, then cover the whole thing with one of those plastic pads, then mount the compressor onto the plastic pads. Does this sound right or is there something else I need to be looking out for?

    One of the reasons I haven't fixed this yet is because I figured if I needed to remove the compressor and reinstall it's presumably much more expensive and time consuming, and a PIA. I'm not 100% sure if I'd even want to reinstall it (beat up looking, but perfectly good working 10 SEER 2 ton vintage 1996 unit).

    Also assume that when the A/C compressor is in it's temporary location I'm not using it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,954

    Hmm

    how about lifting the condenser up and slid some 2X6s with cider blocks to support it on both sides(keep it wide).then have them do that concrete first around/under where the condenser was..let it cure slide your new pad in and drop the condenser back in place.if your just going to go vetical on it you should be OK,if your going to swing it out and away that copper line movement is something to consider.
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    149
    Your method sounds OK if all I were doing is replacing the existing pad underneath the compressor. I was re-doing a whole backyard area that happens to contain the existing compressor that is currently on it's own separate piece of concrete surrounded by grass. I wasn't wanting the compresor to be on it's own piece of concrete when I'm done. I was wanting it to look like it was all done at once. Maybe I should post a pic or drawing.

    The comment about it being OK to lift and drop the compressor and not move it side to side made sense though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    You have to be very careful with the condenser as far as moving it.....you can damage the lineset,and if it's under the house slab it could get costly. Personally,from what you're describing,I would box it in whenb framing the new slab, pour the new slab first, and then use this as a support to hold the 2x6's or whatever,raise it up gingerly,and fill in the rest. Hard to say without seeing though.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,954
    give us a pix from the yard looking at the condenser and the house,and a side shot house to condenser
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    149





    This next picture I added a red line showing where I really want the concrete to go out to:

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    2,111
    If the fence is staying, hang it off the fence.
    "FIGHT CRIME: SHOOT BACK"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    You're lucky. That one can be lifted fairly easy.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

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